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Page 275

CHAPTER XIX

seat near the door. When demands for a speech grew pressing, she remembered a sick boy who must be visited and slipped out quietly.
Wren came in on tiptoe, just as Spencer-Mace was sitting down. He had exceeded the minimum three minutes and had put the classic case against the classical education. Wren took a seat at the back among the members of the debate. The library sprawled in easy chairs at the far end of the room. Swinley, president, and Robin, who had to write out the minutes afterwards, were making notes at the table.
" Mr. Worming," said Swinley, half rising from his chair.
" Mr. President, m'dame, m'tutor, and gentlemen," said Worming, and stopped. He took out a square of paper and peered at it. " The main advantage of a classical education is that it provides the growing boy with a sense of proportion and balance, while at the same time-while at the same time-while at the same time teaching him to express his thoughts as they develop in his mind." Worming Major stopped and looked round. " Hear, hear," said Beckett. Miss Fuller began to clap and caught Wren looking at her. Worming Major unfolded his paper. " It has been well said by the famous Dr. Arnold, headmaster of Rugby."
" Shame," said Featherstone.
" Go on, please," said Swinley.
" It has been well said by Dr. Arnold, the famous headmaster of Rugby, that, that .., maths and stinks may be all right in their way." Worming stopped and bent over his paper. Mr. Wren stared at his boots. Peter reached for the Tatler and opened it quietly.
" The point is," said Worming. " Maths and stinks and that sort of thing are not, well, they're all right as far as they go."
" Did Dr. Arnold say that? " whispered Oliver.
" I'm afraid I've left out a bit," said Worming, unfolding his paper into a large square.
" Try not to read your speech," said Swinley.
" Anyhow, with a classical education such as we have here

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