Books > Old Books > Decent Fellows (1930)


Page 92

CHAPTER VIII

a green parasol. Mr. Bailey always wore his suits with an expression of regret that he must wear anything at all. But he put on the right things and they suited him without his knowledge. He wore a blue serge suit, white spats, and a black and white knitted tie. His bowler hat dated him pleasantly. Denis was slower in taking in his sister's changed appearance. It was a year since he had last seen her. She was in a brightly-flowered frock, cut, he supposed, in what Spencer-Mace called the new fashion, and she wore a large and floppy hat. But there was something else he noticed. There was something controlled and possessive about her figure. In the old days it had seemed to belong to anyone but Joan ; but to-day it was very much part of her, and Joan seemed to know it.
Denis felt awfully proud of his family, and he felt proportionately sorry for a boy in front of him, whose father was striding along in a vulgar grey check and a light velour. A bookmaker probably. How awful to have a bookmaker for a father. And then the weight on his arm reminded him of the infernal thing he was carrying. His gaiety clouded over at the prospect of carting the hamper down Eton High Street. He dared not suggest a cab and he felt a guilty shame of being seen with the hamper. Somebody would be sure to rag him about it the next day. They would not actually accuse his people of meanness, or worse still of poverty ; that would be caddish. But they would not fail to tell him that he had been spotted. Mr. Bailey was not the slightest mean. He merely did not mind carrying hampers.
The journey down the High Street took ten minutes. The party left some of their things in Denis's room, heard him answer " Here, sir," at absence, and strolled out through the playing fields. On Upper Club the second eleven were playing the second eleven of the Ramblers, an Old Etonian cricket club. On Agar's Plough the two first elevens were engaged. But the trees on Agar's Plough were sparse and small and the greater part of the crowd preferred to wander or sit in the shade of Upper Club.
There was a garden party atmosphere about the second

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE a green parasol. Mr. Bailey always wore his suits with an expression of regret that he must wear anything at all. But he put on what is right things and they suited him without his knowledge. He wore a blue serge suit, white spats, and a black and white knitted tie. His bowler hat dated him pleasantly. Denis was slower in taking in his sister's changed appearance. It was a year since he had last seen her. She was in a brightly-flowered frock, cut, he supposed, in what Spencer-Mace called what is new fashion, and she wore a large and floppy hat. But there was something else he noticed. There was something controlled and possessive about her figure. In what is old days it had seemed to belong to anyone but Joan ; but to-day it was very much part of her, and Joan seemed to know it. Denis felt awfully proud of his family, and he felt proportionately sorry for a boy in front of him, whose father was stri where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Decent Fellows (1930) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 92 where is strong CHAPTER VIII where is p align="justify" a green parasol. Mr. Bailey always wore his suits with an expression of regret that he must wear anything at all. But he put on what is right things and they suited him without his knowledge. He wore a blue serge suit, white spats, and a black and white knitted tie. His bowler hat dated him pleasantly. Denis was slower in taking in his sister's changed appearance. It was a year since he had last seen her. She was in a brightly-flowered frock, cut, he supposed, in what Spencer-Mace called what is new fashion, and she wore a large and floppy hat. But there was something else he noticed. There was something controlled and possessive about her figure. In what is old days it had seemed to belong to anyone but Joan ; but to-day it was very much part of her, and Joan seemed to know it. Denis felt awfully proud of his family, and he felt proportionately sorry for a boy in front of him, whose father was striding along in a vulgar grey check and a light velour. A bookmaker probably. How awful to have a bookmaker for a father. And then what is weight on his arm reminded him of what is infernal thing he was carrying. His gaiety clouded over at what is prospect of carting what is hamper down Eton High Street. He dared not suggest a cab and he felt a guilty shame of being seen with what is hamper. Somebody would be sure to rag him about it what is next day. They would not actually accuse his people of meanness, or worse still of poverty ; that would be caddish. But they would not fail to tell him that he had been spotted. Mr. Bailey was not what is slightest mean. He merely did not mind carrying hampers. what is journey down what is High Street took ten minutes. what is party left some of their things in Denis's room, heard him answer " Here, sir," at absence, and strolled out through what is playing fields. On Upper Club what is second eleven were playing what is second eleven of what is Ramblers, an Old Etonian cricket club. On Agar's Plough what is two first elevens were engaged. But what is trees on Agar's Plough were sparse and small and what is greater part of what is crowd preferred to wander or sit in what is shade of Upper Club. There was a garden party atmosphere about what is second where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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