Books > Old Books > Decent Fellows (1930)


Page 90

CHAPTER VIII

from an old woman on Barnspool Bridge. He saw himself in his d.b. waistcoat and pink carnation and with rolled umbrella ; on the station, meeting his people ; the brilliant scene on Upper Club ; lunch in Wren's private dining-reom ; strolling round with Joan, then tea in his own room, and the fireworks and procession of boats at night. And, most of all, he thought of all the things he wanted to say ; all the experiences he wanted to unload ; things he seemed to have done lately at Eton with the sole object of relating them to someone else. Little things like ragging Perrier, when Perrier had jumped up and exclaimed, " You will take two hundred tickets and one yellow line," and Perrier could not understand why the whole division was dissolved in laughter. He decided to tell his people about his tanning. He had kept his beatings secret or alluded to them in a casual way. But now he felt he could tell everything. He so wanted his father and mother to share his Eton life with him. It would be easier to-day. Past efforts had dried up in arid half truths. Eton and Wren's had refused to be told. His mother still groped after the life he really led, while his father frowned at the bald results. But the Fourth of June would put it right. The sun had risen now and it was going to be hot on Upper Club. " I got six up father, as hard as Freeman could lam in. I got six up," Denis repeated and fell asleep.
By half-past ten, Windsor station was crowded. Gay waistcoats and buttonholes were everywhere on the platforms ; newly rolled umbrellas were swung about, while their owners gave their hats a last shine on the sleeve on their coats. As they passed the station refreshment room, boys glanced in the mirror and went away smiling. Only the stationmaster seemed unmoved. Kings and Queens were always getting out at Windsor and occasions such as the Fourth were part of his routine. The beginning and end of the half caused a certain flutter among the station staff, as the Etonian scale of tipping was notoriously high. Higher possibly than that of the Kings and Queens, who got out at Windsor. Porters grumbled at a mere sixpence, and the

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