Books > Old Books > Decent Fellows (1930)


Page 32

CHAPTER III

collar and far more economical. He got on to a chair and reached down a hatbox. His top-hat was ruffled and had a bad dent on one side. With an occasional ironing it should last till the Fourth of June, and, as a last resource, a few drops of hair oil would give it a nice shiny finish.
There was no early school on the first morning of the half. He put on his hat and went out to read his fate on the school notice board. A small crowd was by the notice board, peering at the long strips of names printed in groups of twenty or thirty according to their divisions. Denis found himself. Yes, he was up to Daddy Long Legs all right for maths ; Wilson for science-that would be fun ; Hunter for classics again ; Perrier for French, and Raven for history. Not so bad as it might be. French and Stinks at least promised good sport, as both Wilson and Perrier produced the most unexpected explosions in their different ways.
He looked up one or two of his friends on the list and hurried back to breakfast. The dining-room was full. Several boys, who had arrived late after prayers last night, were quietly eating breakfast. It was war time, when Denis had first gone to Wren's, and breakfast was a question of who could get back first from early school. Six ounces of sugar per week was allowed to each boy, and the sugar was pooled in a common bowl. Denis's division room at early school had been a quarter of a mile distant, and he got very little sugar that half. Everyone grabbed far more than they could possibly eat-bread, margarine, marmalade, and a synthetic product called honey sugar. Those, who had grabbed, then defended their food hoards against late comers. But with the Armistice, breakfast, as other meals at Wren's, had improved, until there was no fault to find with its quantity, and very little with its rough but wholesome quality. Miss Fuller was a good caterer, and she had a good appetite herself Porridge, eggs and bacon or fish, and as much toast and bread as they wanted ; tea or coffee-it was reasonable value for their parents' £300 per annum.
After breakfast there was chapel. Chapel at Eton was compulsory for all but Roman Catholics, Jews, and infidels.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE collar and far more economical. He got on to a chair and reached down a hatbox. His top-hat was ruffled and had a bad dent on one side. With an occasional ironing it should last till what is Fourth of June, and, as a last resource, a few drops of hair oil would give it a nice shiny finish. There was no early school on what is first morning of what is half. He put on his hat and went out to read his fate on what is school notice board. A small crowd was by what is notice board, peering at what is long strips of names printed in groups of twenty or thirty according to their divisions. Denis found himself. Yes, he was up to Daddy Long Legs all right for maths ; Wilson for science-that would be fun ; Hunter for classics again ; Perrier for French, and Raven for history. Not so bad as it might be. French and Stinks at least promised good sport, as both Wilson and Perrier produced what is most unexpected explosions in th where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Decent Fellows (1930) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 32 where is strong CHAPTER III where is p align="justify" collar and far more economical. He got on to a chair and reached down a hatbox. His top-hat was ruffled and had a bad dent on one side. With an occasional ironing it should last till what is Fourth of June, and, as a last resource, a few drops of hair oil would give it a nice shiny finish. There was no early school on what is first morning of the half. He put on his hat and went out to read his fate on the school notice board. A small crowd was by what is notice board, peering at what is long strips of names printed in groups of twenty or thirty according to their divisions. Denis found himself. Yes, he was up to Daddy Long Legs all right for maths ; Wilson for science-that would be fun ; Hunter for classics again ; Perrier for French, and Raven for history. Not so bad as it might be. French and Stinks at least promised good sport, as both Wilson and Perrier produced what is most unexpected explosions in their different ways. He looked up one or two of his friends on what is list and hurried back to breakfast. what is dining-room was full. Several boys, who had arrived late after prayers last night, were quietly eating breakfast. It was war time, when Denis had first gone to Wren's, and breakfast was a question of who could get back first from early school. Six ounces of sugar per week was allowed to each boy, and what is sugar was pooled in a common bowl. Denis's division room at early school had been a quarter of a mile distant, and he got very little sugar that half. Everyone grabbed far more than they could possibly eat-bread, margarine, marmalade, and a synthetic product called honey sugar. Those, who had grabbed, then defended their food hoards against late comers. But with what is Armistice, breakfast, as other meals at Wren's, had improved, until there was no fault to find with its quantity, and very little with its rough but wholesome quality. Miss Fuller was a good caterer, and she had a good appetite herself Porridge, eggs and bacon or fish, and as much toast and bread as they wanted ; tea or coffee-it was reasonable value for their parents' £300 per annum. After breakfast there was chapel. Chapel at Eton was compulsory for all but Roman Catholics, Jews, and infidels. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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