Books > Old Books > Decent Fellows (1930)


Page 29

CHAPTER II

house order. It was their duty to prevent a lull in the conversation, in which some awkward witticism from lower down the table might drift up to their tutor's ears. It was a point of honour to keep Wren talking, and there were only three subjects on which he would converse with any fluency-painting, music, and motor cars. Freeman, although in sixth form, knew little of the first two, and heartily despised the latter. Like other country gentlemen, he believed that once he had read The Times, he could talk to anyone. But as Mr. Wren secretly read the Daily Mirror it was left to Viscount Swinley on his left to prepare leading questions on sparking plugs and such details.
Supper, unlike midday dinner, was an informal meal. Boys wandered in when they liked, so long as they were present for prayers. Wren did not appear till the last plate had been cleared away. He might not appear then ; in which case a boy was sent to lure him from his port if a dinner party happened to be going on. On the first night of the half, Mr. Wren appeared when the bread and cheese were still in play. He sat and talked for a little ; then glancing round the room, rose and began to read from a much thumbed prayer card. After a few verses he knelt down at the end of the table, his long weather-beaten nose dusting the crumbs on the cloth.
" O Lord, our Heavenly Father," and the boys followed him, sentence by sentence, always a word or two in arrears. Some prayed louder, from zeal or from their position in the house. Denis followed inaudibly. He felt meek and disarmed. He thought of the unity of the kneeling room. And at that moment a score of other houses in Eton were on their knees. Surely public schools stood for something very real, and of all schools Eton was the finest. Denis would have liked to go on relaxing. He buried his head in his hands. But Mr. Wren finished his prayer. Someone sneezed over a previously laid trail of pepper. The unity of the house broke into thirty small parts, and with it went the meekness. Now they were thirty odd boys of independent body and mind under a common compulsion ; and Denis

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felt homesick. Just for a moment he saw the Cormorant, swinging at her moorings in the Speenmouth pool. He had had no time to feel alone since his return. Now he was fully conscious of the transition ; what Maureen called the separate life. She was right. It was absurdly separate. It was so funny to wake up at home and go to bed at school. Then a harsh scraping of chairs recalled his thoughts. The house rose from their knees. Prayers were over. He forgot that he had woken up at Anglersmead. Another half at Eton had begun.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE house order. It was their duty to prevent a lull in what is conversation, in which some awkward witticism from lower down what is table might drift up to their tutor's ears. It was a point of honour to keep Wren talking, and there were only three subjects on which he would converse with any fluency-painting, music, and motor cars. Freeman, although in sixth form, knew little of what is first two, and heartily despised what is latter. Like other country gentlemen, he believed that once he had read what is Times, he could talk to anyone. But as Mr. Wren secretly read what is Daily Mirror it was left to Viscount Swinley on his left to prepare leading questions on sparking plugs and such details. Supper, unlike midday dinner, was an informal meal. Boys wandered in when they liked, so long as they were present for prayers. Wren did not appear till what is last plate had been cleared away. He might not appear then ; in w where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Decent Fellows (1930) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 29 where is strong CHAPTER II where is p align="justify" house order. It was their duty to prevent a lull in what is conversation, in which some awkward witticism from lower down what is table might drift up to their tutor's ears. It was a point of honour to keep Wren talking, and there were only three subjects on which he would converse with any fluency-painting, music, and motor cars. Freeman, although in sixth form, knew little of the first two, and heartily despised what is latter. Like other country gentlemen, he believed that once he had read what is Times, he could talk to anyone. But as Mr. Wren secretly read what is Daily Mirror it was left to Viscount Swinley on his left to prepare leading questions on sparking plugs and such details. Supper, unlike midday dinner, was an informal meal. Boys wandered in when they liked, so long as they were present for prayers. Wren did not appear till what is last plate had been cleared away. He might not appear then ; in which case a boy was sent to lure him from his port if a dinner party happened to be going on. On what is first night of what is half, Mr. Wren appeared when what is bread and cheese were still in play. He sat and talked for a little ; then glancing round what is room, rose and began to read from a much thumbed prayer card. After a few verses he knelt down at what is end of what is table, his long weather-beaten nose dusting what is crumbs on what is cloth. " O Lord, our Heavenly Father," and what is boys followed him, sentence by sentence, always a word or two in arrears. Some prayed louder, from zeal or from their position in what is house. Denis followed inaudibly. He felt meek and disarmed. He thought of what is unity of what is kneeling room. And at that moment a score of other houses in Eton were on their knees. Surely public schools stood for something very real, and of all schools Eton was what is finest. Denis would have liked to go on relaxing. He buried his head in his hands. But Mr. Wren finished his prayer. Someone sneezed over a previously laid trail of pepper. what is unity of what is house broke into thirty small parts, and with it went what is meekness. Now they were thirty odd boys of independent body and mind under a common compulsion ; and Denis where is p align="left" Page 30 where is strong CHAPTER II where is p align="justify" felt homesick. Just for a moment he saw what is Cormorant, swinging at her moorings in what is Speenmouth pool. He had had no time to feel alone since his return. Now he was fully conscious of what is transition ; what Maureen called what is separate life. She was right. It was absurdly separate. It was so funny to wake up at home and go to bed at school. Then a harsh scraping of chairs recalled his thoughts. what is house rose from their knees. Prayers were over. He forgot that he had woken up at Anglersmead. Another half at Eton had begun. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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