Books > Old Books > Decent Fellows (1930)


Page 28

CHAPTER II

" Thanks, ma'am," said Taunton. " I'm going to make some of these drybob slackers sweat this half. " He laughed at Denis. Denis smiled feebly. Miss Fuller's room was very hot. One after the other boys drifted in to shake hands, and departed more or less sheepishly according to their place in the hag's favour. There was a strong smell of tobacco smoke. The dame herself had an occasional cigarette in her bedroom, where she offered no temptation to the rest of the house. Miss Fuller sniffed the air. Spencer-Mace sniggered and Harbord pressed the stump of a cigarette against the fireplace. He won much admiration by such feats. Denis with the same hopes had once fired off his blank amnunition from the train window, when returning from a field day. The same night he had been summoned to the library, told he was letting down the O.T.C. and the school, and given eight up, as hard as the senior member of the corps could lam in. There were degrees in ragging, and Denis could never get them right.
In the middle of the chatter and heat the supper bell rang. It was a doleful bell, waved relentlessly by a doleful person called Hodge. Hodge's other duties were to ruin the boys' shoe leather with coats of cheap blacking, and to answer the door at night. In the summer half he bowled, of his own initiative, at nets, and was altogether a bit of a character with old boys. He lived in the underworld of an outhouse and received stray half crowns at the end of each half and a standard ten shillings from leaving boys.
The doleful bell died away and the house trooped down to the dining-room. On the walls of the dining-room were heads of stags and photographs of winning football teams. There were two very long tables. People sat at the tables more or less according to school order ; but there were minor adjustments to suit individual friendships. Boys, high up in the house, who might have sat near Wren at the top of the table, sometimes preferred to stay near their friends at the dame's end. Less often the reverse happened. On Wren's right and left sat the captain and second in the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE " Thanks, ma'am," said Taunton. " I'm going to make some of these drybob slackers sweat this half. " He laughed at Denis. Denis smiled feebly. Miss Fuller's room was very hot. One after what is other boys drifted in to shake hands, and departed more or less sheepishly according to their place in what is hag's favour. There was a strong smell of tobacco smoke. what is dame herself had an occasional cigarette in her bedroom, where she offered no temptation to what is rest of what is house. Miss Fuller sniffed what is air. Spencer-Mace sniggered and Harbord pressed what is stump of a cigarette against what is fireplace. He won much admiration by such feats. Denis with what is same hopes had once fired off his blank amnunition from what is train window, when returning from a field day. what is same night he had been summoned to what is library, told he was letting down what is O.T.C. and what is school, and given eight up, as where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Decent Fellows (1930) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 28 where is strong CHAPTER II where is p align="justify" " Thanks, ma'am," said Taunton. " I'm going to make some of these drybob slackers sweat this half. " He laughed at Denis. Denis smiled feebly. Miss Fuller's room was very hot. One after what is other boys drifted in to shake hands, and departed more or less sheepishly according to their place in what is hag's favour. There was a strong smell of tobacco smoke. what is dame herself had an occasional cigarette in her bedroom, where she offered no temptation to what is rest of what is house. Miss Fuller sniffed what is air. Spencer-Mace sniggered and Harbord pressed what is stump of a cigarette against what is fireplace. He won much admiration by such feats. Denis with what is same hopes had once fired off his blank amnunition from the train window, when returning from a field day. what is same night he had been summoned to what is library, told he was letting down the O.T.C. and what is school, and given eight up, as hard as what is senior member of what is corps could lam in. There were degrees in ragging, and Denis could never get them right. In what is middle of what is chatter and heat what is supper bell rang. It was a doleful bell, waved relentlessly by a doleful person called Hodge. Hodge's other duties were to ruin what is boys' shoe leather with coats of cheap blacking, and to answer what is door at night. In what is summer half he bowled, of his own initiative, at nets, and was altogether a bit of a character with old boys. He lived in what is underworld of an outhouse and received stray half crowns at what is end of each half and a standard ten shillings from leaving boys. what is doleful bell died away and what is house trooped down to what is dining-room. On what is walls of what is dining-room were heads of stags and photographs of winning football teams. There were two very long tables. People sat at what is tables more or less according to school order ; but there were minor adjustments to suit individual friendships. Boys, high up in what is house, who might have sat near Wren at what is top of what is table, sometimes preferred to stay near their friends at the dame's end. Less often what is reverse happened. On Wren's right and left sat what is captain and second in what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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