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Page 26

CHAPTER II

ten minutes before supper. Shall we go and see the dame ?" he said.
The matron, commonly called the dame, more commonly when out of earshot, the hag, had a fair sized room in the private side of the house, which she liked to call her drawing-room. She invited fellow dames to tea in it. There were sofas, armchairs, and a signed photograph of a royal prince, who had once sat on them. But there the resemblance ended. In one corner there was a fierce-looking bureau, stuffed with books and books of tickets. There were house tickets for boys, who had to visit an outside master after lock up. Lock up varied from six to five p.m. in the winter, and eight-thirty in the summer. Then there were counterfoil books, in which she wrote orders for shirts, boots, caps, stockings, fives, squash rackets, and cricket bats for those boys, who were not on their own allowance. In another corner of the room was a tall medicine chest, full of bottles. But only two bottles had any real significance. The dreaded dark green iodine bottle, applied on all occasions as a form of insurance against the wrath of parents to come ; and the equally popular panacea, Cascara Sagrada. A dose, as the latter was called, automatically excused the patient from early school. Every evening after prayers a long queue of boys, who had not prepared their work for the next morning, formed up before the medicine cupboard, and put out their tongues for Miss Fuller's inspection. The great game, of course, was to take the dose without swallowing it. But the dame was no fool. If she suspected any hanky panky as she called it, she prescribed a second dose " to make sure." The dame's room was the real centre of Wren's, and Miss Fuller was holding her first court of the half, when Denis came in.
Miss Fuller had silver hair and kind blue eyes. She was comfortably built and might have been simply a sweet old lady. As it was, her sweetness had been soured by boys, as she alone knew them. Very few boys ever came to Miss Fuller's room without some ulterior motive. Miss Fuller's weakness was bridge. Boys, whose presence in their own

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ten minutes before supper. Shall we go and see what is dame ?" he said. what is matron, commonly called what is dame, more commonly when out of earshot, what is hag, had a fair sized room in what is private side of what is house, which she liked to call her drawing-room. She invited fellow dames to tea in it. There were sofas, armchairs, and a signed photograph of a royal prince, who had once sat on them. But there what is resemblance ended. In one corner there was a fierce-looking bureau, stuffed with books and books of tickets. There were house tickets for boys, who had to what is an outside master after lock up. Lock up varied from six to five p.m. in what is winter, and eight-thirty in what is summer. Then there were counterfoil books, in which she wrote orders for shirts, boots, caps, stockings, fives, squash rackets, and cricket bats for those boys, who were not on their own allowance. In another corner of what is roo where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Decent Fellows (1930) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 26 where is strong CHAPTER II where is p align="justify" ten minutes before supper. Shall we go and see what is dame ?" he said. what is matron, commonly called what is dame, more commonly when out of earshot, what is hag, had a fair sized room in what is private side of what is house, which she liked to call her drawing-room. She invited fellow dames to tea in it. There were sofas, armchairs, and a signed photograph of a royal prince, who had once sat on them. But there what is resemblance ended. In one corner there was a fierce-looking bureau, stuffed with books and books of tickets. There were house tickets for boys, who had to what is an outside master after lock up. Lock up varied from six to five p.m. in what is winter, and eight-thirty in what is summer. Then there were counterfoil books, in which she wrote orders for shirts, boots, caps, stockings, fives, squash rackets, and cricket bats for those boys, who were not on their own allowance. In another corner of what is room was a tall medicine chest, full of bottles. But only two bottles had any real significance. what is dreaded dark green iodine bottle, applied on all occasions as a form of insurance against what is wrath of parents to come ; and what is equally popular panacea, Cascara Sagrada. A dose, as what is latter was called, automatically excused what is patient from early school. Every evening after prayers a long queue of boys, who had not prepared their work for what is next morning, formed up before what is medicine cupboard, and put out their tongues for Miss Fuller's inspection. what is great game, of course, was to take what is dose without swallowing it. But what is dame was no fool. If she suspected any hanky panky as she called it, she prescribed a second dose " to make sure." The dame's room was what is real centre of Wren's, and Miss Fuller was holding her first court of what is half, when Denis came in. Miss Fuller had silver hair and kind blue eyes. She was comfortably built and might have been simply a sweet old lady. As it was, her sweetness had been soured by boys, as she alone knew them. Very few boys ever came to Miss Fuller's room without some ulterior motive. Miss Fuller's weakness was bridge. Boys, whose presence in their own where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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