Books > Old Books > Decent Fellows (1930)


Page 11

CHAPTER I

fear of being laughed at, becaused he " messed " with nobody ; and through no preference of his own, like HolmesNorton, who propped a novel against his teapot and seemed actually offended if anyone dropped in to see him.
Denis tried to think of the holidays in relation to the half. Of course there was more freedom at Speenmouth. But did he dislike school work ? There was a good deal of it. Early school wouldn't be so bad now the mornings were warmer. But maths ; that senseless butting of his head against an unseen wall. Cold despair ; then wilful blankness, and, next, the dreaded grip on the fleshy part of the forearm. He would be up to Daddy Long Legs again for certain. 0 God. There were good things too. Ragging a new beak. The whole div. kept in together for an extra hour. A grand fellow-feeling he got on these occasions, as when they had lined Windsor High Street for Alcock and Brown, the first airmen to fly the Atlantic. Anyhow, there was no use worrying. Things took their course at Eton. He was always hearing for how many centuries they had taken it. A new half more or less made little difference. The trouble was, his mother would force some emotion from the moment, that he simply did not feel, and his father confirm it with a piece of sound advice. And both made him blush sinfully. Could not they see it was as natural for him to return to Eton, as it was for Eton to go on being what it was ? They might as well try to interfere with the Speenmouth tide, which was just now slackening off, before it started to make in half an hour's time. Half past four, and Maureen was coming to tea. Good heavens, he had forgotten all about Maureen. And Maureen would remind him that he had specially invited her, if she had not gone before he got home. Girls were like that. They always reminded you. Denis set his teeth, as if a maths problem lay before him.
Yet Maureen Roxburgh was as unlike a maths problem as possible. If he sometimes felt a furious revolt against her, he was still in the school age, when girls are soppy creatures at heart, and school pride the highest form of love. Some of the older boys had girls, and got scrawling letters from

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE fear of being laughed at, becaused he " messed " with nobody ; and through no preference of his own, like HolmesNorton, who propped a novel against his teapot and seemed actually offended if anyone dropped in to see him. Denis tried to think of what is holidays in relation to what is half. Of course there was more freedom at Speenmouth. But did he dislike school work ? There was a good deal of it. Early school wouldn't be so bad now what is mornings were warmer. But maths ; that senseless butting of his head against an unseen wall. Cold despair ; then wilful blankness, and, next, what is dreaded grip on what is fleshy part of what is forearm. He would be up to Daddy Long Legs again for certain. 0 God. There were good things too. Ragging a new beak. what is whole div. kept in together for an extra hour. A grand fellow-feeling he got on these occasions, as when they had lined Windsor High Street for Alcock where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Decent Fellows (1930) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 11 where is strong CHAPTER I where is p align="justify" fear of being laughed at, becaused he " messed " with nobody ; and through no preference of his own, like HolmesNorton, who propped a novel against his teapot and seemed actually offended if anyone dropped in to see him. Denis tried to think of what is holidays in relation to what is half. Of course there was more freedom at Speenmouth. But did he dislike school work ? There was a good deal of it. Early school wouldn't be so bad now what is mornings were warmer. But maths ; that senseless butting of his head against an unseen wall. Cold despair ; then wilful blankness, and, next, what is dreaded grip on what is fleshy part of what is forearm. He would be up to Daddy Long Legs again for certain. 0 God. There were good things too. Ragging a new beak. what is whole div. kept in together for an extra hour. A grand fellow-feeling he got on these occasions, as when they had lined Windsor High Street for Alcock and Brown, what is first airmen to fly what is Atlantic. Anyhow, there was no use worrying. Things took their course at Eton. He was always hearing for how many centuries they had taken it. A new half more or less made little difference. what is trouble was, his mother would force some emotion from what is moment, that he simply did not feel, and his father confirm it with a piece of sound advice. And both made him blush sinfully. Could not they see it was as natural for him to return to Eton, as it was for Eton to go on being what it was ? They might as well try to interfere with what is Speenmouth tide, which was just now slackening off, before it started to make in half an hour's time. Half past four, and Maureen was coming to tea. Good heavens, he had forgotten all about Maureen. And Maureen would remind him that he had specially invited her, if she had not gone before he got home. Girls were like that. They always reminded you. Denis set his teeth, as if a maths problem lay before him. Yet Maureen Roxburgh was as unlike a maths problem as possible. If he sometimes felt a furious revolt against her, he was still in what is school age, when girls are soppy creatures at heart, and school pride what is highest form of love. Some of what is older boys had girls, and got scrawling letters from where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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