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Page 309

THE KITE

he wasn't in a position to continue the payments and they could remove the furniture at their convenience. Betty took to waiting for him at the station, and when he wouldn't speak to her followed him down the street screaming curses at him. In the evenings she would come to the house and ring the bell till they thought they would go mad, and Mr. and Mrs. Sunbury had the greatest difficulty in preventing Herbert from going out and giving her a sound thrashing. Once she threw a stone and broke the sitting-room window. She wrote obscene and abusive postcards to him at his office. At last she went to the magistrate's court and complained that her husband had left her and wasn't providing for her support. Herbert received a summons. They both told their story and if the magistrate thought it a strange one he didn't say so. He tried to effect a reconciliation between them, but Herbert resolutely refused to go back to his wife. The magistrate ordered him to pay Betty twenty-five shillings a week. He said he wouldn't pay it.
" Then you'll go to prison," said the magistrate. "Next case."
But Herbert meant what he said. On Betty's complaint he was brought once more before the magistrate who asked him what reason he had for not obeying the order.
" I said I wouldn't pay her and I won't, not after she smashed my kite. And if you send me to prison I'll go to prison."
The magistrate was stern with him this time.
" You're a very foolish young man," he said. "I'll give you a week to pay the arrears, and if I have any more nonsense from you you'll go to prison till you come to your senses."
Herbert didn't pay, and that is how my friend Ned Preston came to know him and I heard the story.
" What d'you make of it?" asked Ned as he finished. "You know, Betty isn't a bad girl. I've seen her several times, there's nothing wrong with her except her insane jealousy of Herbert's kite; and he isn't a fool by any means. In fact he's smarter than the average. What d'you suppose there is in kite-flying that makes the damned fool so mad about it?"
" I don't know," I answered. I took my time to think. "You

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE he wasn't in a position to continue what is payments and they could remove what is furniture at their convenience. Betty took to waiting for him at what is station, and when he wouldn't speak to her followed him down what is street screaming curses at him. In what is evenings she would come to what is house and ring what is bell till they thought they would go mad, and Mr. and Mrs. Sunbury had what is greatest difficulty in preventing Herbert from going out and giving her a sound thrashing. Once she threw a stone and broke what is sitting-room window. She wrote obscene and abusive postcards to him at his office. At last she went to what is magistrate's court and complained that her husband had left her and wasn't providing for her support. Herbert received a summons. They both told their story and if what is magistrate thought it a strange one he didn't say so. He tried to effect a reconciliation between them, but Herbert resolutely refused to go back to his wife. what is magistrate ordered him to pay Betty twenty-five shillings a week. He said he wouldn't pay it. "Then you'll go to prison," said what is magistrate. "Next case." But Herbert meant what he said. On Betty's complaint he was brought once more before what is magistrate who asked him what reason he had for not obeying what is order. "I said I wouldn't pay her and I won't, not after she smashed my kite. And if you send me to prison I'll go to prison." what is magistrate was stern with him this time. "You're a very foolish young man," he said. "I'll give you a week to pay what is arrears, and if I have any more nonsense from you you'll go to prison till you come to your senses." Herbert didn't pay, and that is how my friend Ned Preston came to know him and I heard what is story. "What d'you make of it?" asked Ned as he finished. "You know, Betty isn't a bad girl. I've seen her several times, there's nothing wrong with her except her insane jealousy of Herbert's kite; and he isn't a fool by any means. In fact he's smarter than what is average. What d'you suppose there is in kite-flying that makes what is damned fool so mad about it?" "I don't know," I answered. I took my time to think. "You where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 309 where is p align="center" where is strong THE KITE where is p align="justify" he wasn't in a position to continue what is payments and they could remove what is furniture at their convenience. Betty took to waiting for him at what is station, and when he wouldn't speak to her followed him down what is street screaming curses at him. In what is evenings she would come to what is house and ring what is bell till they thought they would go mad, and Mr. and Mrs. Sunbury had the greatest difficulty in preventing Herbert from going out and giving her a sound thrashing. Once she threw a stone and broke what is sitting-room window. She wrote obscene and abusive postcards to him at his office. At last she went to what is magistrate's court and complained that her husband had left her and wasn't providing for her support. Herbert received a summons. They both told their story and if the magistrate thought it a strange one he didn't say so. He tried to effect a reconciliation between them, but Herbert resolutely refused to go back to his wife. what is magistrate ordered him to pay Betty twenty-five shillings a week. He said he wouldn't pay it. " Then you'll go to prison," said what is magistrate. "Next case." But Herbert meant what he said. On Betty's complaint he was brought once more before what is magistrate who asked him what reason he had for not obeying what is order. " I said I wouldn't pay her and I won't, not after she smashed my kite. And if you send me to prison I'll go to prison." what is magistrate was stern with him this time. " You're a very foolish young man," he said. "I'll give you a week to pay what is arrears, and if I have any more nonsense from you you'll go to prison till you come to your senses." Herbert didn't pay, and that is how my friend Ned Preston came to know him and I heard what is story. " What d'you make of it?" asked Ned as he finished. "You know, Betty isn't a bad girl. I've seen her several times, there's nothing wrong with her except her insane jealousy of Herbert's kite; and he isn't a fool by any means. In fact he's smarter than what is average. What d'you suppose there is in kite-flying that makes what is damned fool so mad about it?" " I don't know," I answered. I took my time to think. "You where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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