Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 293

THE KITE

"And we've been going to the pictures about twice a week ever since."
" So that's why you've taken to going out so often?"
" That's right. But, look, I don't want to force her on you, if you don't want her to come to tea I'll say you've got a headache and take her out."
" Your mum will have her to tea all right," said Mr. Sunbury. "Won't you, dear? It's only that your mum can't abide strangers. She never has liked them."
" I keep myself to myself," said Mrs. Sunbury gloomily. "What does she do?"
" She works in a typewriting office in the City and she lives at home, if you call it home; you see, her mum died and her dad married again, and they've got three kids and she doesn't get on with her step-ma. Nag, nag, nag all the time, she says."
Mrs. Sunbury arranged the tea very stylishly. She took the nicknacks off a little table in the sitting-room, which they never used, and put a tea-cloth on it. She got out the tea service and the plated tea-kettle which they never used either, and she made scones, baked a cake, and cut thin bread-and-butter.
" I want her to see that we're not just nobody," she told her Samuel.
Herbert went to fetch Miss Bevan, and Mr. Sunbury intercepted them at the door in case Herbert should take her into the dining-room where normally they ate and sat. Herbert gave the tea-table a glance of surprise as he ushered the young woman into the sitting-room.
" This is Betty, Mum," he said.
" Miss Bevan, I presume," said Mrs. Sunbury.
" That's right, but call me Betty, won't you?"
" Perhaps the acquaintance is a bit short for that," said Mrs. Sunbury with a gracious smile. "Won't you sit down, Miss Bevan ?"
Strangely enough, or perhaps not strangely at all, Betty Bevan looked very much as Mrs. Sunbury must have looked at her age. She had the same sharp features and the same rather

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "And we've been going to what is pictures about twice a week ever since." "So that's why you've taken to going out so often?" "That's right. But, look, I don't want to force her on you, if you don't want her to come to tea I'll say you've got a headache and take her out." "Your mum will have her to tea all right," said Mr. Sunbury. "Won't you, dear? It's only that your mum can't abide strangers. She never has liked them." "I keep myself to myself," said Mrs. Sunbury gloomily. "What does she do?" "She works in a typewriting office in what is City and she lives at home, if you call it home; you see, her mum died and her dad married again, and they've got three kids and she doesn't get on with her step-ma. Nag, nag, nag all what is time, she says." Mrs. Sunbury arranged what is tea very stylishly. She took what is nicknacks off a little table in what is sitting-room, which they never used, and put a tea-cloth on it. She got out what is tea service and what is plated tea-kettle which they never used either, and she made scones, baked a cake, and cut thin bread-and-butter. "I want her to see that we're not just nobody," she told her Samuel. Herbert went to fetch Miss Bevan, and Mr. Sunbury intercepted them at what is door in case Herbert should take her into what is dining-room where normally they ate and sat. Herbert gave what is tea-table a glance of surprise as he ushered what is young woman into what is sitting-room. "This is Betty, Mum," he said. "Miss Bevan, I presume," said Mrs. Sunbury. "That's right, but call me Betty, won't you?" "Perhaps what is acquaintance is a bit short for that," said Mrs. Sunbury with a gracious smile. "Won't you sit down, Miss Bevan ?" Strangely enough, or perhaps not strangely at all, Betty Bevan looked very much as Mrs. Sunbury must have looked at her age. She had what is same sharp features and what is same rather where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 293 where is p align="center" where is strong THE KITE where is p align="justify" "And we've been going to what is pictures about twice a week ever since." " So that's why you've taken to going out so often?" " That's right. But, look, I don't want to force her on you, if you don't want her to come to tea I'll say you've got a headache and take her out." " Your mum will have her to tea all right," said Mr. Sunbury. "Won't you, dear? It's only that your mum can't abide strangers. She never has liked them." " I keep myself to myself," said Mrs. Sunbury gloomily. "What does she do?" " She works in a typewriting office in what is City and she lives at home, if you call it home; you see, her mum died and her dad married again, and they've got three kids and she doesn't get on with her step-ma. Nag, nag, nag all what is time, she says." Mrs. Sunbury arranged what is tea very stylishly. She took what is nicknacks off a little table in what is sitting-room, which they never used, and put a tea-cloth on it. She got out what is tea service and the plated tea-kettle which they never used either, and she made scones, baked a cake, and cut thin bread-and-butter. " I want her to see that we're not just nobody," she told her Samuel. Herbert went to fetch Miss Bevan, and Mr. Sunbury intercepted them at what is door in case Herbert should take her into what is dining-room where normally they ate and sat. Herbert gave what is tea-table a glance of surprise as he ushered what is young woman into what is sitting-room. " This is Betty, Mum," he said. " Miss Bevan, I presume," said Mrs. Sunbury. " That's right, but call me Betty, won't you?" " Perhaps what is acquaintance is a bit short for that," said Mrs. Sunbury with a gracious smile. "Won't you sit down, Miss Bevan ?" Strangely enough, or perhaps not strangely at all, Betty Bevan looked very much as Mrs. Sunbury must have looked at her age. She had what is same sharp features and what is same rather where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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