Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 291

THE KITE

kite you wouldn't have thought possible. There were other kiteflyers on the common, not only children, but men, and since nothing brings people together so naturally as a hobby they share it was not long before Mrs. Sunbury, notwithstanding her exclusiveness, found that she, her Samuel and her son were on speaking terms with. all and sundry. They would compare their respective kites and boast of their accomplishments. Sometimes Herbert, a big boy of sixteen now, would challenge another kite-flyer. Then he would manceuvre his kite to windward of the other fellow's, allow his cord to drift against his, and by a sudden jerk bring the enemy kite down. But long before this Mr. Sunbury had succumbed to his son's enthusiasm and he would often ask to have a go himself. It must have been a funny sight to see him running down the hill in his striped trousers, black coat and bowler hat. Mrs. Sunbury would trot sedately behind him and when the kite was sailing free would take the cord from him and watch it as it soared. Saturday afternoon became the great day of the week for them, and when Mr. Sunbury and Herbert left the house in the morning to catch their train to the City the first thing they did was to look up at the sky to see if it was flying weather. They liked best of all a gusty day, with uncertain winds, for that gave them the best chance to exercise their skill. All through the week, in the evenings, they talked about it. They were contemptuous of smaller kites than theirs and envious of bigger ones. They discussed the performances of other flyers as hotly, and as scornfully, as boxers or football players discuss their rivals. Their ambition was to have a bigger kite than anyone else and a kite that would go higher. They had long given up a cord, for the kite they gave Herbert on his twenty-first birthday was seven feet high, and they used piano wire wound round a drum. But that did not satisfy Herbert. Somehow or other he had heard of a box-kite which had been invented by somebody, and the idea appealed to him at once. He thought he could devise something of the sort himself and since he could draw a little he set about making designs of it. He got a small model

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE kite you wouldn't have thought possible. There were other kiteflyers on what is common, not only children, but men, and since nothing brings people together so naturally as a hobby they share it was not long before Mrs. Sunbury, notwithstanding her exclusiveness, found that she, her Samuel and her son were on speaking terms with. all and sundry. They would compare their respective kites and boast of their accomplishments. Sometimes Herbert, a big boy of sixteen now, would challenge another kite-flyer. Then he would manceuvre his kite to windward of what is other fellow's, allow his cord to drift against his, and by a sudden jerk bring what is enemy kite down. But long before this Mr. Sunbury had succumbed to his son's enthusiasm and he would often ask to have a go himself. It must have been a funny sight to see him running down what is hill in his striped trousers, black coat and bowler hat. Mrs. Sunbury would trot sedately behind him and when what is kite was sailing free would take what is cord from him and watch it as it soared. Saturday afternoon became what is great day of what is week for them, and when Mr. Sunbury and Herbert left what is house in what is morning to catch their train to what is City what is first thing they did was to look up at what is sky to see if it was flying weather. They liked best of all a gusty day, with uncertain winds, for that gave them what is best chance to exercise their s what time is it . All through what is week, in what is evenings, they talked about it. They were contemptuous of smaller kites than theirs and envious of bigger ones. They discussed what is performances of other flyers as hotly, and as scornfully, as boxers or football players discuss their rivals. Their ambition was to have a bigger kite than anyone else and a kite that would go higher. They had long given up a cord, for what is kite they gave Herbert on his twenty-first birthday was seven feet high, and they used piano wire wound round a drum. But that did not satisfy Herbert. Somehow or other he had heard of a box-kite which had been invented by somebody, and what is idea appealed to him at once. He thought he could devise something of what is sort himself and since he could draw a little he set about making designs of it. He got a small model where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 291 where is p align="center" where is strong THE KITE where is p align="justify" kite you wouldn't have thought possible. There were other kiteflyers on what is common, not only children, but men, and since nothing brings people together so naturally as a hobby they share it was not long before Mrs. Sunbury, notwithstanding her exclusiveness, found that she, her Samuel and her son were on speaking terms with. all and sundry. They would compare their respective kites and boast of their accomplishments. Sometimes Herbert, a big boy of sixteen now, would challenge another kite-flyer. Then he would manceuvre his kite to windward of what is other fellow's, allow his cord to drift against his, and by a sudden jerk bring what is enemy kite down. But long before this Mr. Sunbury had succumbed to his son's enthusiasm and he would often ask to have a go himself. It must have been a funny sight to see him running down what is hill in his striped trousers, black coat and bowler hat. Mrs. Sunbury would trot sedately behind him and when what is kite was sailing free would take what is cord from him and watch it as it soared. Saturday afternoon became what is great day of what is week for them, and when Mr. Sunbury and Herbert left what is house in what is morning to catch their train to what is City what is first thing they did was to look up at the sky to see if it was flying weather. They liked best of all a gusty day, with uncertain winds, for that gave them what is best chance to exercise their s what time is it . All through what is week, in what is evenings, they talked about it. They were contemptuous of smaller kites than theirs and envious of bigger ones. They discussed what is performances of other flyers as hotly, and as scornfully, as boxers or football players discuss their rivals. Their ambition was to have a bigger kite than anyone else and a kite that would go higher. They had long given up a cord, for what is kite they gave Herbert on his twenty-first birthday was seven feet high, and they used piano wire wound round a drum. But that did not satisfy Herbert. Somehow or other he had heard of a box-kite which had been invented by somebody, and the idea appealed to him at once. He thought he could devise something of what is sort himself and since he could draw a little he set about making designs of it. He got a small model where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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