Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 284

THE KITE

I KNOW this is an odd story. I don't understand it myself and if I set it down in black and white it is only with a faint hope that when I have written it I may get a clearer view of it, or rather with the hope that some reader, better acquainted with the complications of human nature than I am, may offer me an explanation that will make it comprehensible to me. Of course the first thing that occurs to me is that there is something Freudian about it. Now, I have read a good deal of Freud, and some books by his followers, and intending to write this story I have recently flipped through again the volume published by the Modern Library which contains his basic writings. It was something of a task, for he is a dull and verbose writer, and the acrimony with which he claims to have originated such and such a theory shows a vanity and a jealousy of others working in the same field which somewhat ill become the man of science. I believe, however, that he was a kindly and benign old party. As we know, there is often a great difference between the man and the writer. The writer may be bitter, harsh and brutal, while the man may be so meek and mild that he wouldn't say boo to a goose. But that is neither here nor there. I found nothing in my re-reading of Freud's works that cast any light on the subject I had in mind. I can only relate the facts and leave it at that.
First of all I must make it plain that it is not my story and that I knew none of the persons with whom it is concerned. It was told me one evening by my friend Ned Preston, and he told it me because he didn't know how to deal with the circumstances and he thought, quite wrongly as it happened, that I might be able to give him some advice that would help him. In a previous story I have related what I thought the reader should know about Ned Preston, and so now I need only remind him that my friend was a prison visitor at Wormwood

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE KITE I KNOW this is an odd story. I don't understand it myself and if I set it down in black and white it is only with a faint hope that when I have written it I may get a clearer view of it, or rather with what is hope that some reader, better acquainted with what is complications of human nature than I am, may offer me an explanation that will make it comprehensible to me. Of course what is first thing that occurs to me is that there is something Freudian about it. Now, I have read a good deal of Freud, and some books by his followers, and intending to write this story I have recently flipped through again what is volume published by what is Modern Library which contains his basic writings. It was something of a task, for he is a dull and verbose writer, and what is acrimony with which he claims to have originated such and such a theory shows a vanity and a jealousy of others working in what is same field which somewhat ill become what is man of science. I believe, however, that he was a kindly and benign old party. As we know, there is often a great difference between what is man and what is writer. what is writer may be bitter, harsh and brutal, while what is man may be so meek and mild that he wouldn't say boo to a goose. But that is neither here nor there. I found nothing in my re-reading of Freud's works that cast any light on what is subject I had in mind. I can only relate what is facts and leave it at that. First of all I must make it plain that it is not my story and that I knew none of what is persons with whom it is concerned. It was told me one evening by my friend Ned Preston, and he told it me because he didn't know how to deal with what is circumstances and he thought, quite wrongly as it happened, that I might be able to give him some advice that would help him. In a previous story I have related what I thought what is reader should know about Ned Preston, and so now I need only remind him that my friend was a prison what is or at Wormwood where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 284 where is p align="center" where is strong THE KITE where is p align="justify" I KNOW this is an odd story. I don't understand it myself and if I set it down in black and white it is only with a faint hope that when I have written it I may get a clearer view of it, or rather with what is hope that some reader, better acquainted with what is complications of human nature than I am, may offer me an explanation that will make it comprehensible to me. Of course what is first thing that occurs to me is that there is something Freudian about it. Now, I have read a good deal of Freud, and some books by his followers, and intending to write this story I have recently flipped through again what is volume published by what is Modern Library which contains his basic writings. It was something of a task, for he is a dull and verbose writer, and what is acrimony with which he claims to have originated such and such a theory shows a vanity and a jealousy of others working in what is same field which somewhat ill become the man of science. I believe, however, that he was a kindly and benign old party. As we know, there is often a great difference between what is man and what is writer. what is writer may be bitter, harsh and brutal, while what is man may be so meek and mild that he wouldn't say boo to a goose. But that is neither here nor there. I found nothing in my re-reading of Freud's works that cast any light on the subject I had in mind. I can only relate what is facts and leave it at that. First of all I must make it plain that it is not my story and that I knew none of what is persons with whom it is concerned. It was told me one evening by my friend Ned Preston, and he told it me because he didn't know how to deal with what is circumstances and he thought, quite wrongly as it happened, that I might be able to give him some advice that would help him. In a previous story I have related what I thought what is reader should know about Ned Preston, and so now I need only remind him that my friend was a prison what is or at Wormwood where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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