Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 265

EPISODE

Fred Manson was a good-looking fellow, tall, well-made, with blue eyes, good features and a friendly, agreeable smile, but what made him remarkable so that people turned round in the streets to stare at him was that he had a thick head of hair, with a great wave in it, of a deep rich red. It was really a great beauty. Perhaps it was this that gave him so sensual a look. His maleness was like a heady perfutne. His eyebrows were thick, only a little lighter than his hair, and he was lucky enough not to have the ugly skin that so often disfigures redheads. His was a smooth olive. His eyes were bold, and when he smiled or laughed, which in the healthy vitality of his youth he did constantly, his expression was wonderfully alluring. He was twenty-two and he gave you the rather pleasant impression of just loving to be alive. It was inevitable that with such looks and above all with that troubling sexuality he should have success with women. He was charming, tender and passionate, but immensely promiscuous. He was not exactly callous or brazen, he had a kindly nature, but somehow or other he made it quite clear to the objects of his passing fancy that all he wanted was a little bit of fun and that it was impossible for him to remain faithful to anyone.
Fred was a postman. He worked in Brixton. It is a densely populated part of London, and has the curious reputation of harbouring more criminals than any other suburb because trams run to it from across the river all night long, so that when a man has done a job of housebreaking in the West End he can be sure of getting home without difficulty. Fred liked his job. Brixton is a district of innumerable streets lined with little houses inhabited by the people who work in the neighbourhood and also by clerks, shop-assistants, skilled workers of one sort or another whose jobs take them every day across the river. He was strong and healthy and it was a pleasure to him to walk from street to street delivering the letters. Sometimes there would be a postal packet to hand in or a registered letter that had to be signed for, and then he would have the opportunity of seeing people. He was a sociable creature. It was never long

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Fred Manson was a good-looking fellow, tall, well-made, with blue eyes, good features and a friendly, agreeable smile, but what made him remarkable so that people turned round in what is streets to stare at him was that he had a thick head of hair, with a great wave in it, of a deep rich red. It was really a great beauty. Perhaps it was this that gave him so sensual a look. His maleness was like a heady perfutne. His eyebrows were thick, only a little lighter than his hair, and he was lucky enough not to have what is ugly skin that so often disfigures redheads. His was a smooth olive. His eyes were bold, and when he smiled or laughed, which in what is healthy vitality of his youth he did constantly, his expression was wonderfully alluring. He was twenty-two and he gave you what is rather pleasant impression of just loving to be alive. It was inevitable that with such looks and above all with that troubling sports uality he should have success with women. He was charming, tender and passionate, but immensely promiscuous. He was not exactly callous or brazen, he had a kindly nature, but somehow or other he made it quite clear to what is objects of his passing fancy that all he wanted was a little bit of fun and that it was impossible for him to remain faithful to anyone. Fred was a postman. He worked in Brixton. It is a densely populated part of London, and has what is curious reputation of harbouring more criminals than any other suburb because trams run to it from across what is river all night long, so that when a man has done a job of housebreaking in what is West End he can be sure of getting home without difficulty. Fred liked his job. Brixton is a district of innumerable streets lined with little houses inhabited by what is people who work in what is neighbourhood and also by clerks, shop-assistants, s what time is it ed workers of one sort or another whose jobs take them every day across what is river. He was strong and healthy and it was a pleasure to him to walk from street to street delivering what is letters. Sometimes there would be a postal packet to hand in or a registered letter that had to be signed for, and then he would have what is opportunity of seeing people. He was a sociable creature. It was never long where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 265 where is p align="center" where is strong EPISODE where is p align="justify" Fred Manson was a good-looking fellow, tall, well-made, with blue eyes, good features and a friendly, agreeable smile, but what made him remarkable so that people turned round in the streets to stare at him was that he had a thick head of hair, with a great wave in it, of a deep rich red. It was really a great beauty. Perhaps it was this that gave him so sensual a look. His maleness was like a heady perfutne. His eyebrows were thick, only a little lighter than his hair, and he was lucky enough not to have the ugly skin that so often disfigures redheads. His was a smooth olive. His eyes were bold, and when he smiled or laughed, which in the healthy vitality of his youth he did constantly, his expression was wonderfully alluring. He was twenty-two and he gave you the rather pleasant impression of just loving to be alive. It was inevitable that with such looks and above all with that troubling sports uality he should have success with women. He was charming, tender and passionate, but immensely promiscuous. He was not exactly callous or brazen, he had a kindly nature, but somehow or other he made it quite clear to what is objects of his passing fancy that all he wanted was a little bit of fun and that it was impossible for him to remain faithful to anyone. Fred was a postman. He worked in Brixton. It is a densely populated part of London, and has what is curious reputation of harbouring more criminals than any other suburb because trams run to it from across what is river all night long, so that when a man has done a job of housebreaking in what is West End he can be sure of getting home without difficulty. Fred liked his job. Brixton is a district of innumerable streets lined with little houses inhabited by what is people who work in what is neighbourhood and also by clerks, shop-assistants, s what time is it ed workers of one sort or another whose jobs take them every day across what is river. He was strong and healthy and it was a pleasure to him to walk from street to street delivering what is letters. Sometimes there would be a postal packet to hand in or a registered letter that had to be signed for, and then he would have what is opportunity of seeing people. He was a sociable creature. It was never long where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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