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EPISODE

for us and we went in. We passed through the halls in which the men were working.
" If you see any pals of yours take no notice of them," Ned said to me. "They don't like it."
" Am I likely to see any pals of mine?" I asked drily.
" You never can tell. I shouldn't be surprised if you had had friends who'd passed bad cheques once too often or were caught in a compromising situation in one of the parks. You'd be surprised how often I run across chaps I've met out at dinner."
One of Ned's duties was to see prisoners through the first difficult days of their confinement. They were often badly shaken by their trial and sentence; and when, after the preliminary proceedings they had to go through on entering the ;ail, the stripping, the bath, the medical examination and the questioning, the getting into prison clothes, they were led into a cell and locked up, they were apt to break down. Sometimes they cried hysterically; sometimes they could neither eat nor sleep. Ned's business then was to cheer them, and his breezy manner, his natural kindliness, often worked wonders. If they were anxious about their wives and children he would go to see them and if they were destitute provide them with money. He brought them news so that they might get over the awful feeling that they were shut away from the common interests of their fellow men. He read the sporting papers to be able to tell them what horse had won an important race or whether the champion had won his fight. He would advise them about their future, and when the time approached for their release see what jobs they were fitted for and then persuade employers to give them a chance to make good.
Since everyone is interested in crime it was inevitable that sooner or later, with Ned there, the conversation should turn upon it. It was after dinner and we were sitting comfortably in the drawing-room with drinks in our hands.
" Had any interesting cases at the Scrubs lately, Ned?" I asked him.
" No, nothing much."

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE for us and we went in. We passed through what is halls in which what is men were working. "If you see any pals of yours take no notice of them," Ned said to me. "They don't like it." "Am I likely to see any pals of mine?" I asked drily. "You never can tell. I shouldn't be surprised if you had had friends who'd passed bad cheques once too often or were caught in a compromising situation in one of what is parks. You'd be surprised how often I run across chaps I've met out at dinner." One of Ned's duties was to see prisoners through what is first difficult days of their confinement. They were often badly shaken by their trial and sentence; and when, after what is preliminary proceedings they had to go through on entering what is ;ail, what is stripping, what is bath, what is medical examination and what is questioning, what is getting into prison clothes, they were led into a cell and locked up, they were apt to break down. Sometimes they cried hysterically; sometimes they could neither eat nor sleep. Ned's business then was to cheer them, and his breezy manner, his natural kindliness, often worked wonders. If they were anxious about their wives and children he would go to see them and if they were destitute provide them with money. He brought them news so that they might get over what is awful feeling that they were shut away from what is common interests of their fellow men. He read what is sporting papers to be able to tell them what horse had won an important race or whether what is champion had won his fight. He would advise them about their future, and when what is time approached for their release see what jobs they were fitted for and then persuade employers to give them a chance to make good. Since everyone is interested in crime it was inevitable that sooner or later, with Ned there, what is conversation should turn upon it. It was after dinner and we were sitting comfortably in what is drawing-room with drinks in our hands. "Had any interesting cases at what is Scrubs lately, Ned?" I asked him. "No, nothing much." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 263 where is p align="center" where is strong EPISODE where is p align="justify" for us and we went in. We passed through what is halls in which what is men were working. " If you see any pals of yours take no notice of them," Ned said to me. "They don't like it." " Am I likely to see any pals of mine?" I asked drily. " You never can tell. I shouldn't be surprised if you had had friends who'd passed bad cheques once too often or were caught in a compromising situation in one of what is parks. You'd be surprised how often I run across chaps I've met out at dinner." One of Ned's duties was to see prisoners through what is first difficult days of their confinement. They were often badly shaken by their trial and sentence; and when, after what is preliminary proceedings they had to go through on entering what is ;ail, what is stripping, the bath, what is medical examination and what is questioning, what is getting into prison clothes, they were led into a cell and locked up, they were apt to break down. Sometimes they cried hysterically; sometimes they could neither eat nor sleep. Ned's business then was to cheer them, and his breezy manner, his natural kindliness, often worked wonders. If they were anxious about their wives and children he would go to see them and if they were destitute provide them with money. He brought them news so that they might get over what is awful feeling that they were shut away from what is common interests of their fellow men. He read what is sporting papers to be able to tell them what horse had won an important race or whether what is champion had won his fight. He would advise them about their future, and when what is time approached for their release see what jobs they were fitted for and then persuade employers to give them a chance to make good. Since everyone is interested in crime it was inevitable that sooner or later, with Ned there, what is conversation should turn upon it. It was after dinner and we were sitting comfortably in what is drawing-room with drinks in our hands. " Had any interesting cases at what is Scrubs lately, Ned?" I asked him. " No, nothing much." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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