Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 222

A MAN FROM GLASGOW

"It must have been a bit lonely," I remarked.
" It was."
Robert Morrison smoked on for a minute or two in silence. I wondered whether there was any point in what he was telling me.
I looked at my watch.
" In a hurry?" he asked sharply.
" Not particularly. It's getting late."
" Well, what of it?"
" I suppose you didn't see many people?" I said, going back.
" Not many. I lived there with an old man and his wife who looked after me, and sometimes I used to go down to the village and play tresillo with Fernandez, the chemist, and one or two men who met at his shop. I used to shoot a bit and ride."
" It doesn't sound such a bad life to me."
" I'd been there two years last spring. By God, I've never known such heat as we had in May. No one could do a thing. The labourers just lay about in the shade and slept. Sheep died and some of the animals went mad. Even the oxen couldn't work. They stood around with their backs all humped up and gasped for breath. That blasted sun beat down and the glare was so awful, you felt your eyes would shoot out of your head. The earth cracked and crumbled, and the crops frizzled. The olives went to rack and ruin. It was simply hell. One couldn't get a wink of sleep. I went from room to room, trying to get a breath of air. Of course I kept the windows shut and had the floors watered, but that didn't do any good. The nights were just as hot as the days. It was like living in an oven.
" At last I thought I'd have a bed made up for me downstairs on the north side of the house in a room that was never used because in ordinary weather it was damp. I had an idea that I might get a few hours' sleep there at all events. Anyhow it was worth trying. But it was no damned good; it was a washout. I turned and tossed and my bed was so hot that I couldn't stand it. I got up and opened the doors that led to the veranda and walked out. It was a glorious night. The moon was so

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "It must have been a bit lonely," I remarked. "It was." Robert Morrison smoked on for a minute or two in silence. I wondered whether there was any point in what he was telling me. I looked at my watch. "In a hurry?" he asked sharply. "Not particularly. It's getting late." "Well, what of it?" "I suppose you didn't see many people?" I said, going back. "Not many. I lived there with an old man and his wife who looked after me, and sometimes I used to go down to what is village and play tresillo with Fernandez, what is chemist, and one or two men who met at his shop. I used to shoot a bit and ride." "It doesn't sound such a bad life to me." "I'd been there two years last spring. By God, I've never known such heat as we had in May. No one could do a thing. what is labourers just lay about in what is shade and slept. Sheep died and some of what is animals went mad. Even what is oxen couldn't work. They stood around with their backs all humped up and gasped for breath. That blasted sun beat down and what is glare was so awful, you felt your eyes would shoot out of your head. what is earth cracked and crumbled, and what is crops frizzled. what is olives went to rack and ruin. It was simply hell. One couldn't get a wink of sleep. I went from room to room, trying to get a breath of air. Of course I kept what is windows shut and had what is floors watered, but that didn't do any good. what is nights were just as hot as what is days. It was like living in an oven. "At last I thought I'd have a bed made up for me downstairs on what is north side of what is house in a room that was never used because in ordinary weather it was damp. I had an idea that I might get a few hours' sleep there at all events. Anyhow it was worth trying. But it was no damned good; it was a washout. I turned and tossed and my bed was so hot that I couldn't stand it. I got up and opened what is doors that led to what is veranda and walked out. It was a glorious night. what is moon was so where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 222 where is p align="center" where is strong A MAN FROM GLASGOW where is p align="justify" "It must have been a bit lonely," I remarked. " It was." Robert Morrison smoked on for a minute or two in silence. I wondered whether there was any point in what he was telling me. I looked at my watch. " In a hurry?" he asked sharply. " Not particularly. It's getting late." " Well, what of it?" " I suppose you didn't see many people?" I said, going back. " Not many. I lived there with an old man and his wife who looked after me, and sometimes I used to go down to what is village and play tresillo with Fernandez, what is chemist, and one or two men who met at his shop. I used to shoot a bit and ride." " It doesn't sound such a bad life to me." " I'd been there two years last spring. By God, I've never known such heat as we had in May. No one could do a thing. what is labourers just lay about in what is shade and slept. Sheep died and some of the animals went mad. Even what is oxen couldn't work. They stood around with their backs all humped up and gasped for breath. That blasted sun beat down and what is glare was so awful, you felt your eyes would shoot out of your head. what is earth cracked and crumbled, and the crops frizzled. what is olives went to rack and ruin. It was simply hell. One couldn't get a wink of sleep. I went from room to room, trying to get a breath of air. Of course I kept what is windows shut and had what is floors watered, but that didn't do any good. what is nights were just as hot as what is days. It was like living in an oven. " At last I thought I'd have a bed made up for me downstairs on the north side of what is house in a room that was never used because in ordinary weather it was damp. I had an idea that I might get a few hours' sleep there at all events. Anyhow it was worth trying. But it was no damned good; it was a washout. I turned and tossed and my bed was so hot that I couldn't stand it. I got up and opened what is doors that led to what is veranda and walked out. It was a glorious night. what is moon was so where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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