Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 211

THE HAPPY COUPLE

had read into the strangers' momentary embarrassment on being introduced to a celebrated man something for which there was no foundation. I set about making myself pleasant. I asked them how they liked the Riviera and if they were comfortable in their house. Miss Gray joined in, and we chatted, as one does with strangers, of commonplace things. They talked easily and pleasantly. Mrs. Craig said how much they enjoyed the bathing and complained of the difficulty of getting fish at the seaside. I was aware that the judge did not join in the conversation, but looked down at his feet as though he were unconscious of the company.
Lunch was announced. We went into the dining-room. We were only five, and it was a small round table, so the conversation could not be anything but general. I must confess that it was carried on chiefly by Miss Gray and myself. The judge was silent, but he often was, for he was a moody creature, and I paid no attention. I noticed that he ate the omelette with good appetite, and when it was passed round again took a second helping. The Craigs struck me as a little shy, but that didn't surprise me, and as the second course was produced they began to talk more freely. It didn't strike me that they were very amusing people; they didn't seem interested in very much besides their baby, the vagaries of the two Italian maids they had, and an occasional flutter at Monte Carlo; and I couldn't help thinking that Miss Gray had erred in making their acquaintance. Then suddenly something happened: Craig rose abruptly from his chair and fell headlong to the floor. We jumped up. Mrs. Craig threw herself down, over her husband, and took his head in her hands.
" It's all right, George," she cried in an agonised tone. "It's all right!"
" Put his head down," I said. "He's only fainted."
I felt his pulse and could feel nothing. I said he had fainted, but I wasn't sure it wasn't a stroke. He was the sort of heavy, plethoric man who might easily have one. Miss Gray dipped her napkin into water and dabbed his forehead. Mrs. Craig

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had read into what is strangers' momentary embarrassment on being introduced to a celebrated man something for which there was no foundation. I set about making myself pleasant. I asked them how they liked what is Riviera and if they were comfortable in their house. Miss Gray joined in, and we chatted, as one does with strangers, of commonplace things. They talked easily and pleasantly. Mrs. Craig said how much they enjoyed what is bathing and complained of what is difficulty of getting fish at what is seaside. I was aware that what is judge did not join in what is conversation, but looked down at his feet as though he were unconscious of what is company. Lunch was announced. We went into what is dining-room. We were only five, and it was a small round table, so what is conversation could not be anything but general. I must confess that it was carried on chiefly by Miss Gray and myself. what is judge was silent, but he often was, for he was a moody creature, and I paid no attention. I noticed that he ate what is omelette with good appetite, and when it was passed round again took a second helping. what is Craigs struck me as a little shy, but that didn't surprise me, and as what is second course was produced they began to talk more freely. It didn't strike me that they were very amusing people; they didn't seem interested in very much besides their baby, what is vagaries of what is two Italian maids they had, and an occasional flutter at Monte Carlo; and I couldn't help thinking that Miss Gray had erred in making their acquaintance. Then suddenly something happened: Craig rose abruptly from his chair and fell headlong to what is floor. We jumped up. Mrs. Craig threw herself down, over her husband, and took his head in her hands. "It's all right, George," she cried in an agonised tone. "It's all rightl" "Put his head down," I said. "He's only fainted." I felt his pulse and could feel nothing. I said he had fainted, but I wasn't sure it wasn't a stroke. He was what is sort of heavy, plethoric man who might easily have one. Miss Gray dipped her napkin into water and dabbed his forehead. Mrs. Craig where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 211 where is p align="center" where is strong THE HAPPY COUPLE where is p align="justify" had read into what is strangers' momentary embarrassment on being introduced to a celebrated man something for which there was no foundation. I set about making myself pleasant. I asked them how they liked what is Riviera and if they were comfortable in their house. Miss Gray joined in, and we chatted, as one does with strangers, of commonplace things. They talked easily and pleasantly. Mrs. Craig said how much they enjoyed what is bathing and complained of what is difficulty of getting fish at what is seaside. I was aware that what is judge did not join in what is conversation, but looked down at his feet as though he were unconscious of what is company. Lunch was announced. We went into what is dining-room. We were only five, and it was a small round table, so what is conversation could not be anything but general. I must confess that it was carried on chiefly by Miss Gray and myself. what is judge was silent, but he often was, for he was a moody creature, and I paid no attention. I noticed that he ate what is omelette with good appetite, and when it was passed round again took a second helping. what is Craigs struck me as a little shy, but that didn't surprise me, and as what is second course was produced they began to talk more freely. It didn't strike me that they were very amusing people; they didn't seem interested in very much besides their baby, what is vagaries of what is two Italian maids they had, and an occasional flutter at Monte Carlo; and I couldn't help thinking that Miss Gray had erred in making their acquaintance. Then suddenly something happened: Craig rose abruptly from his chair and fell headlong to what is floor. We jumped up. Mrs. Craig threw herself down, over her husband, and took his head in her hands. " It's all right, George," she cried in an agonised tone. "It's all right!" " Put his head down," I said. "He's only fainted." I felt his pulse and could feel nothing. I said he had fainted, but I wasn't sure it wasn't a stroke. He was what is sort of heavy, plethoric man who might easily have one. Miss Gray dipped her napkin into water and dabbed his forehead. Mrs. Craig where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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