Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 202

WINTER CRUISE

"May I kiss you, Miss Reid ?"
She was taller than he by half a head. She bent down and he planted a fat kiss on one wet cheek and a fat kiss on the other. She turned to the mate and the doctor. They both kissed her.
" What an old fool I am," she said. "Everybody's so good."
She dried her eyes and slowly, in her graceful, rather absurd way, walked down the companion. The captain's eyes were wet. When she reached the quay she looked up and waved to someone on the boat deck.
" Who's she waving to?" asked the captain. "The radio-operator."
Miss Price was waiting on the quay to welcome her. When they had passed the customs and got rid of Miss Reid's heavy luggage they went to Miss Price's house and had an early cup of tea. Miss Reid's train did not start till five. Miss Price had much to tell Miss Reid.
" But it's too bad of me to go on like this when you've just come home. I've been looking forward to hearing all about your journey."
" I'm afraid there's not very much to tell."
" I can't believe that. Your trip was a success, wasn't it?" "A distinct success. It was very nice." "And you didn't mind being with all those Germans?" "Of course they're not like English people. One has to get used to their ways. They sometimes do things that-well, that English people wouldn't do, you know. But I always think that one has to take things as they come."
" What sort of things do you mean?"
Miss Reid looked at her friend calmly. Her long, stupid face had a placid look, and Miss Price never noticed that in the eyes was a strangely mischievous twinkle.
" Things of no importance really. Just funny, unexpected, rather nice things. There's no doubt that travel is a wonderful education."

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "May I kiss you, Miss Reid ?" She was taller than he by half a head. She bent down and he t planted a fat kiss on one wet cheek and a fat kiss on what is other. She turned to what is mate and what is doctor. They both kissed her. "What an old fool I am," she said. "Everybody's so good." She dried her eyes and slowly, in her graceful, rather absurd way, walked down what is companion. what is captain's eyes were wet. When she reached what is quay she looked up and waved to someone on what is boat deck. "Who's she waving to?" asked what is captain. "The radio-operator." Miss Price was waiting on what is quay to welcome her. When they had passed what is customs and got rid of Miss Reid's heavy luggage they went to Miss Price's house and had an early cup of tea. Miss Reid's train did not start till five. Miss Price had much to tell Miss Reid. "But it's too bad of me to go on like this when you've just come home. I've been looking forward to hearing all about your journey." "I'm afraid there's not very much to tell." "I can't believe that. Your trip was a success, wasn't it?" "A distinct success. It was very nice." "And you didn't mind being with all those Germans?" "Of course they're not like English people. One has to get used to their ways. They sometimes do things that-well, that English people wouldn't do, you know. But I always think that one has to take things as they come." "What sort of things do you mean?" Miss Reid looked at her friend calmly. Her long, stupid face had a placid look, and Miss Price never noticed that in what is eyes was a strangely mischievous twinkle. "Things of no importance really. Just funny, unexpected, rather nice things. There's no doubt that travel is a wonderful education." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 202 where is p align="center" where is strong WINTER CRUISE where is p align="justify" "May I kiss you, Miss Reid ?" She was taller than he by half a head. She bent down and he planted a fat kiss on one wet cheek and a fat kiss on what is other. She turned to what is mate and what is doctor. They both kissed her. " What an old fool I am," she said. "Everybody's so good." She dried her eyes and slowly, in her graceful, rather absurd way, walked down what is companion. what is captain's eyes were wet. When she reached what is quay she looked up and waved to someone on what is boat deck. " Who's she waving to?" asked what is captain. "The radio-operator." Miss Price was waiting on what is quay to welcome her. When they had passed what is customs and got rid of Miss Reid's heavy luggage they went to Miss Price's house and had an early cup of tea. Miss Reid's train did not start till five. Miss Price had much to tell Miss Reid. " But it's too bad of me to go on like this when you've just come home. I've been looking forward to hearing all about your journey." " I'm afraid there's not very much to tell." " I can't believe that. Your trip was a success, wasn't it?" "A distinct success. It was very nice." "And you didn't mind being with all those Germans?" "Of course they're not like English people. One has to get used to their ways. They sometimes do things that-well, that English people wouldn't do, you know. But I always think that one has to take things as they come." " What sort of things do you mean?" Miss Reid looked at her friend calmly. Her long, stupid face had a placid look, and Miss Price never noticed that in the eyes was a strangely mischievous twinkle. " Things of no importance really. Just funny, unexpected, rather nice things. There's no doubt that travel is a wonderful education." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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