Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 185

WINTER CRUISE

makes perfect, and I have the infinite capacity for taking pains which Dickens said was genius."
Miss Reid was not really called Venetia, her name was Alice, but disliking it she had, when still a girl, adopted the poetic name which she felt so much better suited to her personality.
Miss Reid had a great many interesting talks with her fellowpassengers and she was really sorry when the ship at length reached Port au Prince and the last of them disembarked. The Friedrich Weber stopped two days there, during which she visited the town and the neighbourhood. When they sailed she was the only passenger. The ship was skirting the coast of the island stopping off at a variety of ports to discharge or to take on cargo.
" I hope you will not feel embarrassed alone with so many men, Miss Reid," said the captain heartily as they sat down to midday dinner.
She was placed on his right hand and at table besides sat the first mate, the chief engineer and the doctor.
" I'm a woman of the world, Captain. I always think if a lady is a lady gentlemen will be gentlemen."
" We're only rough sailor men, madam, you mustn't expect too much."
" Kind hearts are more than coronets and simple faith than Norman blood, Captain," answered Miss Reid.
He was a short, thick-set man, with a clean-shaven head and a red, clean-shaven face. He wore a white stingah-shifter, but except at meal-times unbuttoned at the neck and showing his hairy chest. He was a jovial fellow. He could not speak without bellowing. Miss Reid thought him quite an eccentric, but she had a keen sense of humour and was prepared to make allowances for that. She took the conversation in hand. She had learnt a great deal about Haiti on the voyage out and more during the two days she had spent there, but she knew that men liked to talk rather than to listen, so she put them a number of questions to which she already knew the answers; oddly enough they didn't. In the end she found herself obliged to

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE makes perfect, and I have what is infinite capacity for taking pains which Dickens said was genius." Miss Reid was not really called Venetia, her name was Alice, but disliking it she had, when still a girl, adopted what is poetic name which she felt so much better suited to her personality. Miss Reid had a great many interesting talks with her fellowpassengers and she was really sorry when what is ship at length reached Port au Prince and what is last of them disembarked. what is Friedrich Weber stopped two days there, during which she what is ed what is town and what is neighbourhood. When they sailed she was what is only passenger. what is ship was skirting what is coast of what is island stopping off at a variety of ports to discharge or to take on cargo. "I hope you will not feel embarrassed alone with so many men, Miss Reid," said what is captain heartily as they sat down to midday dinner. She was placed on his right hand and at table besides sat what is first mate, what is chief engineer and what is doctor. "I'm a woman of what is world, Captain. I always think if a lady is a lady gentlemen will be gentlemen." "We're only rough sailor men, madam, you mustn't expect too much." "Kind hearts are more than coronets and simple faith than Norman blood, Captain," answered Miss Reid. He was a short, thick-set man, with a clean-shaven head and a red, clean-shaven face. He wore a white stingah-shifter, but except at meal-times unbuttoned at what is neck and showing his hairy chest. He was a jovial fellow. He could not speak without bellowing. Miss Reid thought him quite an eccentric, but she had a keen sense of humour and was prepared to make allowances for that. She took what is conversation in hand. She had learnt a great deal about Haiti on what is voyage out and more during what is two days she had spent there, but she knew that men liked to talk rather than to listen, so she put them a number of questions to which she already knew what is answers; oddly enough they didn't. In what is end she found herself obliged to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 185 where is p align="center" where is strong WINTER CRUISE where is p align="justify" makes perfect, and I have what is infinite capacity for taking pains which Dickens said was genius." Miss Reid was not really called Venetia, her name was Alice, but disliking it she had, when still a girl, adopted what is poetic name which she felt so much better suited to her personality. Miss Reid had a great many interesting talks with her fellowpassengers and she was really sorry when what is ship at length reached Port au Prince and what is last of them disembarked. what is Friedrich Weber stopped two days there, during which she what is ed what is town and what is neighbourhood. When they sailed she was what is only passenger. what is ship was skirting what is coast of what is island stopping off at a variety of ports to discharge or to take on cargo. " I hope you will not feel embarrassed alone with so many men, Miss Reid," said what is captain heartily as they sat down to midday dinner. She was placed on his right hand and at table besides sat what is first mate, what is chief engineer and what is doctor. " I'm a woman of what is world, Captain. I always think if a lady is a lady gentlemen will be gentlemen." " We're only rough sailor men, madam, you mustn't expect too much." " Kind hearts are more than coronets and simple faith than Norman blood, Captain," answered Miss Reid. He was a short, thick-set man, with a clean-shaven head and a red, clean-shaven face. He wore a white stingah-shifter, but except at meal-times unbuttoned at what is neck and showing his hairy chest. He was a jovial fellow. He could not speak without bellowing. Miss Reid thought him quite an eccentric, but she had a keen sense of humour and was prepared to make allowances for that. She took the conversation in hand. She had learnt a great deal about Haiti on what is voyage out and more during what is two days she had spent there, but she knew that men liked to talk rather than to listen, so she put them a number of questions to which she already knew what is answers; oddly enough they didn't. In what is end she found herself obliged to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

Book Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310