Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 184

WINTER CRUISE

Reid was a good sailor, as indeed was only to be expected since her grandfather had been a naval officer, but after a couple of roughish days the weather was fine and in a very short while she knew all her fellow-passengers. She was a good mixer. That was one of the reasons why she had made a success of her business; she owned a tea-room at a celebrated beauty spot in the west of England and she always had a smile and a pleasant word for every customer who came in; she closed down in the winter and for the last four years had taken a cruise. You met such interesting people, she said, and you always learnt something. It was true that the passengers on the Friedrich Weber weren't of quite so good a class as those she had met the year before on her Mediterranean cruise, but Miss Reid was not a snob, and though the table manners of some of them shocked her somewhat, determined to look upon the bright side of things she decided to make the best of them. She was a great reader and she was glad, on looking at the ship's library, to find that there were a lot of books by Phillips Oppenheim, Edgar Wallace and Agatha Christie; but with so many people to talk to she had no time for reading and she made up her mind to leave them till the ship emptied herself at Haiti.
" After all," she said, "human nature is more important than literature."
Miss Reid had always had the reputation of being a good talker and she flattered herself that not once during the many days they were at sea had she allowed the conversation at table to languish. She knew how to draw people out, and whenever a topic seemed to be exhausted she had a remark ready to revive it or another topic waiting on the tip of her tongue to set the conversation off again. Her friend Miss Prince, daughter of the late Vicar of Campden, who had come to see her off at Plymouth, for she lived there, had often said to her:
" You know, Venetia, you have a mind like a man. You're never at a loss for something to say."
" Well, I think if you're interested in everyone, everyone will be interested in you," Miss Reid answered modestly. "Practice

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Reid was a good sailor, as indeed was only to be expected since her grandfather had been a naval officer, but after a couple of roughish days what is weather was fine and in a very short while she knew all her fellow-passengers. She was a good mixer. That was one of what is reasons why she had made a success of her business; she owned a tea-room at a celebrated beauty spot in what is west of England and she always had a smile and a pleasant word for every customer who came in; she closed down in what is winter and for what is last four years had taken a cruise. You met such interesting people, she said, and you always learnt something. It was true that what is passengers on what is Friedrich Weber weren't of quite so good a class as those she had met what is year before on her Mediterranean cruise, but Miss Reid was not a snob, and though what is table manners of some of them shocked her somewhat, determined to look upon what is bright side of things she decided to make what is best of them. She was a great reader and she was glad, on looking at what is ship's library, to find that there were a lot of books by Phillips Oppenheim, Edgar Wallace and Agatha Christie; but with so many people to talk to she had no time for reading and she made up her mind to leave them till what is ship emptied herself at Haiti. "After all," she said, "human nature is more important than literature." Miss Reid had always had what is reputation of being a good talker and she flattered herself that not once during what is many days they were at sea had she allowed what is conversation at table to languish. She knew how to draw people out, and whenever a topic seemed to be exhausted she had a remark ready to revive it or another topic waiting on what is tip of her tongue to set what is conversation off again. Her friend Miss Prince, daughter of what is late Vicar of Campden, who had come to see her off at Plymouth, for she lived there, had often said to her: "You know, Venetia, you have a mind like a man. You're never at a loss for something to say." "Well, I think if you're interested in everyone, everyone will be interested in you," Miss Reid answered modestly. "Practice where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 184 where is p align="center" where is strong WINTER CRUISE where is p align="justify" Reid was a good sailor, as indeed was only to be expected since her grandfather had been a naval officer, but after a couple of roughish days what is weather was fine and in a very short while she knew all her fellow-passengers. She was a good mixer. That was one of what is reasons why she had made a success of her business; she owned a tea-room at a celebrated beauty spot in what is west of England and she always had a smile and a pleasant word for every customer who came in; she closed down in what is winter and for what is last four years had taken a cruise. You met such interesting people, she said, and you always learnt something. It was true that what is passengers on what is Friedrich Weber weren't of quite so good a class as those she had met what is year before on her Mediterranean cruise, but Miss Reid was not a snob, and though what is table manners of some of them shocked her somewhat, determined to look upon the bright side of things she decided to make what is best of them. She was a great reader and she was glad, on looking at what is ship's library, to find that there were a lot of books by Phillips Oppenheim, Edgar Wallace and Agatha Christie; but with so many people to talk to she had no time for reading and she made up her mind to leave them till what is ship emptied herself at Haiti. " After all," she said, "human nature is more important than literature." Miss Reid had always had what is reputation of being a good talker and she flattered herself that not once during what is many days they were at sea had she allowed what is conversation at table to languish. She knew how to draw people out, and whenever a topic seemed to be exhausted she had a remark ready to revive it or another topic waiting on what is tip of her tongue to set what is conversation off again. Her friend Miss Prince, daughter of what is late Vicar of Campden, who had come to see her off at Plymouth, for she lived there, had often said to her: " You know, Venetia, you have a mind like a man. You're never at a loss for something to say." " Well, I think if you're interested in everyone, everyone will be interested in you," Miss Reid answered modestly. "Practice where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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