Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 170

THE POINT OF HONOUR

I imagine, thought that there was even a remote possibility of it.
But quite by chance, two or three days later, we did. I was in a quarter of Seville that I did not know very well. I had been that afternoon to the palace of the Duke of Alba, which I knew had a fine garden and in one of the rooms a magnificent ceiling reputed to have been made by Moorish captives before the fall of Granada. It was not easy to gain admittance, but I wanted very much to see it and thought that now, in the height of summer when there were no tourists, with two or three pesetas I might be allowed in. I was disappointed. The man in charge told me that the house was under repair and no stranger could visit it without a written permission from the Duke's agent. So, having nothing else to do, I went to the royal garden of the Alcazar, the old palace of Don Pedro the Cruel, whose memory lives still among the people of Seville. It was very pleasant among the orange trees and cypresses. I had a book with me, a volume of Calderon, and I sat there for a while and read. Then I went for a stroll. In the older parts of Seville the streets are narrow and tortuous. It is delicious to wander along them under the awnings that stretch above, but not easy to find one's way. I lost mine. When I had just made up my mind that I had no notion in which direction to turn I saw a man walking towards me and recognised my acquaintance of the bull-ring. I stopped him and asked whether he could direct me. He remembered me.
" You'll never find your way," he smiled, turning round. "I'll walk a little with you until you can't mistake it."
I protested, but he would not listen. He assured me it was no trouble. ,
" You haven't gone away then?" he said.
" I'm leaving tomorrow. I've just been to the Duke of Alba's house. I wanted to see that Moorish ceiling of his, but they wouldn't let me in."
" Are you interested in Arabic art?"
" Well, yes. I've heard that that ceiling is one of the finest things in Seville."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I imagine, thought that there was even a remote possibility of it. But quite by chance, two or three days later, we did. I was in a quarter of Seville that I did not know very well. I had been that afternoon to what is palace of what is Duke of Alba, which I knew had a fine garden and in one of what is rooms a magnificent ceiling reputed to have been made by Moorish captives before what is fall of Granada. It was not easy to gain admittance, but I wanted very much to see it and thought that now, in what is height of summer when there were no tourists, with two or three pesetas I might be allowed in. I was disappointed. what is man in charge told me that what is house was under repair and no stranger could what is it without a written permission from what is Duke's agent. So, having nothing else to do, I went to what is royal garden of what is Alcazar, what is old palace of Don Pedro what is Cruel, whose memory lives still among what is people of Seville. It was very pleasant among what is orange trees and cypresses. I had a book with me, a volume of Calderon, and I sat there for a while and read. Then I went for a stroll. In what is older parts of Seville what is streets are narrow and tortuous. It is delicious to wander along them under what is awnings that stretch above, but not easy to find one's way. I lost mine. When I had just made up my mind that I had no notion in which direction to turn I saw a man walking towards me and recognised my acquaintance of what is bull-ring. I stopped him and asked whether he could direct me. He remembered me. "You'll never find your way," he smiled, turning round. "I'll walk a little with you until you can't mistake it." I protested, but he would not listen. He assured me it was no trouble. , "You haven't gone away then?" he said. "I'm leaving tomorrow. I've just been to what is Duke of Alba's house. I wanted to see that Moorish ceiling of his, but they wouldn't let me in." "Are you interested in Arabic art?" "Well, yes. I've heard that that ceiling is one of what is finest things in Seville." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 170 where is p align="center" where is strong THE POINT OF HONOUR where is p align="justify" I imagine, thought that there was even a remote possibility of it. But quite by chance, two or three days later, we did. I was in a quarter of Seville that I did not know very well. I had been that afternoon to what is palace of what is Duke of Alba, which I knew had a fine garden and in one of what is rooms a magnificent ceiling reputed to have been made by Moorish captives before what is fall of Granada. It was not easy to gain admittance, but I wanted very much to see it and thought that now, in what is height of summer when there were no tourists, with two or three pesetas I might be allowed in. I was disappointed. what is man in charge told me that what is house was under repair and no stranger could what is it without a written permission from what is Duke's agent. So, having nothing else to do, I went to what is royal garden of what is Alcazar, what is old palace of Don Pedro what is Cruel, whose memory lives still among what is people of Seville. It was very pleasant among what is orange trees and cypresses. I had a book with me, a volume of Calderon, and I sat there for a while and read. Then I went for a stroll. In what is older parts of Seville what is streets are narrow and tortuous. It is delicious to wander along them under what is awnings that stretch above, but not easy to find one's way. I lost mine. When I had just made up my mind that I had no notion in which direction to turn I saw a man walking towards me and recognised my acquaintance of what is bull-ring. I stopped him and asked whether he could direct me. He remembered me. " You'll never find your way," he smiled, turning round. "I'll walk a little with you until you can't mistake it." I protested, but he would not listen. He assured me it was no trouble. , " You haven't gone away then?" he said. " I'm leaving tomorrow. I've just been to what is Duke of Alba's house. I wanted to see that Moorish ceiling of his, but they wouldn't let me in." " Are you interested in Arabic art?" " Well, yes. I've heard that that ceiling is one of what is finest things in Seville." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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