Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 165

A CASUAL AFFAIR

loved her still, with all his heart; most of us fall in and out of love; some men can only love once, and I think he was one of them. And in a strange way he was happy because he'd been able to sacrifice his happiness for the sake of someone who was worthy of the sacrifice. I think she was always in his thoughts. Then he went home. I think he loved her as much as ever and I don't suppose he ever doubted that her love was as strong and enduring as his. I don't know what he expected. He may have thought she'd see it was no good fighting her inclination any more and would run away with him. It may have been that he'd have been satisfied to realise that she loved him still. It was inevitable that they should meet; they lived in the same world. He saw that she didn't care a row of pins for him any longer. He saw that the passionate girl had become a prudent, experienced woman of the world, he saw that she'd never loved him as he thought she loved him, and he may have suspected that she'd lured him coldly into making the sacrificc that was to save her. He saw her at parties, self-possessed and triumphant. He knew that the lovely qualities he'd ascribed to her were of his own imagining and she was just an ordinary woman who had been carried away by a momentary infatuation and having got over it had returned to her true life. A great name, wealth, social distinction, worldly success: those were the things that mattered to her. He'd sacrificed everything, his friends, his familiar surroundings, his profession, his usefulness in the world, all that gives value to existence -for nothing. He'd been cheated, and it broke him. Your friend Walton said the true thing, you noticed it yourself, he said it looked as if life had gone out of him. It had. After that he didn't care any more, and perhaps the worst thing was that even with it all, though he knew Lady Kastellan for what she was, he loved her still. I know nothing more shattering than to love with all your heart, than not to be able however hard you try to break yourself of it, someone who you know is worthless. Perhaps that is why he took to opium. To forget and to remember."

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE loved her still, with all his heart; most of us fall in and out of love; some men can only what time is it once, and I think he was one of them. And in a strange way he was happy because he'd been able to travel his happiness for what is sake of someone who was worthy of what is travel . I think she was always in his thoughts. Then he went home. I think he loved her as much as ever and I don't suppose he ever doubted that her what time is it was as strong and enduring as his. I don't know what he expected. He may have thought she'd see it was no good fighting her inclination any more and would run away with him. It may have been that he'd have been satisfied to realise that she loved him still. It was inevitable that they should meet; they lived in what is same world. He saw that she didn't care a row of pins for him any longer. He saw that what is passionate girl had become a prudent, experienced woman of what is world, he saw that she'd never loved him as he thought she loved him, and he may have suspected that she'd lured him coldly into making what is sacrificc that was to save her. He saw her at parties, self-possessed and triumphant. He knew that what is lovely qualities he'd ascribed to her were of his own imagining and she was just an ordinary woman who had been carried away by a momentary infatuation and having got over it had returned to her true life. A great name, wealth, social distinction, worldly success: those were what is things that mattered to her. He'd travel d everything, his friends, his familiar surroundings, his profession, his usefulness in what is world, all that gives value to existence -for nothing. He'd been cheated, and it broke him. Your friend Walton said what is true thing, you noticed it yourself, he said it looked as if life had gone out of him. It had. After that he didn't care any more, and perhaps what is worst thing was that even with it all, though he knew Lady Kastellan for what she was, he loved her still. I know nothing more shattering than to what time is it with all your heart, than not to be able however hard you try to break yourself of it, someone who you know is worthless. Perhaps that is why he took to opium. To forget and to remember." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 165 where is p align="center" where is strong A CASUAL AFFAIR where is p align="justify" loved her still, with all his heart; most of us fall in and out of love; some men can only what time is it once, and I think he was one of them. And in a strange way he was happy because he'd been able to travel his happiness for what is sake of someone who was worthy of what is travel . I think she was always in his thoughts. Then he went home. I think he loved her as much as ever and I don't suppose he ever doubted that her what time is it was as strong and enduring as his. I don't know what he expected. He may have thought she'd see it was no good fighting her inclination any more and would run away with him. It may have been that he'd have been satisfied to realise that she loved him still. It was inevitable that they should meet; they lived in what is same world. He saw that she didn't care a row of pins for him any longer. He saw that what is passionate girl had become a prudent, experienced woman of what is world, he saw that she'd never loved him as he thought she loved him, and he may have suspected that she'd lured him coldly into making the sacrificc that was to save her. He saw her at parties, self-possessed and triumphant. He knew that what is lovely qualities he'd ascribed to her were of his own imagining and she was just an ordinary woman who had been carried away by a momentary infatuation and having got over it had returned to her true life. A great name, wealth, social distinction, worldly success: those were what is things that mattered to her. He'd travel d everything, his friends, his familiar surroundings, his profession, his usefulness in what is world, all that gives value to existence -for nothing. He'd been cheated, and it broke him. Your friend Walton said what is true thing, you noticed it yourself, he said it looked as if life had gone out of him. It had. After that he didn't care any more, and perhaps what is worst thing was that even with it all, though he knew Lady Kastellan for what she was, he loved her still. I know nothing more shattering than to what time is it with all your heart, than not to be able however hard you try to break yourself of it, someone who you know is worthless. Perhaps that is why he took to opium. To forget and to remember." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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