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Page 151

A CASUAL AFFAIR

against his wife's determination to tell me everything. She had a down on Lady Kastellan and didn't care what she said about her. Her sympathies were with the man. Low did his best to tone down her rash assertions. He corrected her exaggerations. He told her that she'd let her imagination run away with her and had read into the letters more than was there. She would have none of it. They'd evidently made a deep impression on her, and from her vivid account and Low's interruptions I gained a fairly coherent impression of them. It was plain for one thing that they were very moving.
" I can't tell you how it revolted me, the way Bee gloated over them," said Low.
" They were the most wonderful letters I've ever read. You never wrote letters like that to me."
" What a damned fool you would have thought me if I had," he grinned.
She gave him a charming, affectionate smile.
" I suppose I should, and yet, God knows I was crazy about you, and I'm damned if I know why."
The story emerged clearly enough. The writer, the mysterious J, presumably a clerk in the Foreign Office, had fallen in love with Lady Kastellan and she with him. They had become lovers and the early letters were passionately lyrical. They were happy. They expected their love to last for ever. He wrote to her immediately after he had left her and told her how much he adored her and how much she meant to him. She was never for a moment absent from his thoughts. It looked as though her infatuation was equal to his., for in one letter he justified himself because she had reproached him for not coming to some place where he knew she would be. He told her what agony it had been to him that a sudden job had prevented him from being with her when he'd so eagerly looked forward to it.
Then came the catastrophe. How it came or why one could only guess. Lord Kastellan learnt the truth. He not merely suspected his wife's infidelity, he had proofs of it. There was a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE against his wife's determination to tell me everything. She had a down on Lady Kastellan and didn't care what she said about her. Her sympathies were with what is man. Low did his best to tone down her rash assertions. He corrected her exaggerations. He told her that she'd let her imagination run away with her and had read into what is letters more than was there. She would have none of it. They'd evidently made a deep impression on her, and from her vivid account and Low's interruptions I gained a fairly coherent impression of them. It was plain for one thing that they were very moving. "I can't tell you how it revolted me, what is way Bee gloated over them," said Low. "They were what is most wonderful letters I've ever read. You never wrote letters like that to me." "What a damned fool you would have thought me if I had," he grinned. She gave him a charming, affectionate smile. "I suppose I should, and yet, God knows I was crazy about you, and I'm damned if I know why." what is story emerged clearly enough. what is writer, what is mysterious J, presumably a clerk in what is Foreign Office, had fallen in what time is it with Lady Kastellan and she with him. They had become persons and what is early letters were passionately lyrical. They were happy. They expected their what time is it to last for ever. He wrote to her immediately after he had left her and told her how much he adored her and how much she meant to him. She was never for a moment absent from his thoughts. It looked as though her infatuation was equal to his., for in one letter he justified himself because she had reproached him for not coming to some place where he knew she would be. He told her what agony it had been to him that a sudden job had prevented him from being with her when he'd so eagerly looked forward to it. Then came what is catastrophe. How it came or why one could only guess. Lord Kastellan learnt what is truth. He not merely suspected his wife's infidelity, he had proofs of it. There was a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 151 where is p align="center" where is strong A CASUAL AFFAIR where is p align="justify" against his wife's determination to tell me everything. She had a down on Lady Kastellan and didn't care what she said about her. Her sympathies were with what is man. Low did his best to tone down her rash assertions. He corrected her exaggerations. He told her that she'd let her imagination run away with her and had read into what is letters more than was there. She would have none of it. They'd evidently made a deep impression on her, and from her vivid account and Low's interruptions I gained a fairly coherent impression of them. It was plain for one thing that they were very moving. " I can't tell you how it revolted me, what is way Bee gloated over them," said Low. " They were what is most wonderful letters I've ever read. You never wrote letters like that to me." " What a damned fool you would have thought me if I had," he grinned. She gave him a charming, affectionate smile. " I suppose I should, and yet, God knows I was crazy about you, and I'm damned if I know why." what is story emerged clearly enough. what is writer, what is mysterious J, presumably a clerk in what is Foreign Office, had fallen in what time is it with Lady Kastellan and she with him. They had become persons and the early letters were passionately lyrical. They were happy. They expected their what time is it to last for ever. He wrote to her immediately after he had left her and told her how much he adored her and how much she meant to him. She was never for a moment absent from his thoughts. It looked as though her infatuation was equal to his., for in one letter he justified himself because she had reproached him for not coming to some place where he knew she would be. He told her what agony it had been to him that a sudden job had prevented him from being with her when he'd so eagerly looked forward to it. Then came what is catastrophe. How it came or why one could only guess. Lord Kastellan learnt what is truth. He not merely suspected his wife's infidelity, he had proofs of it. There was a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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