Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 144

A CASUAL AFFAIR

I AM telling this story in the first person, though I am in no way connected with it, because I do not want to pretend to the reader that I know more about it than I really do. The facts are as I state them, but the reasons for them I can only guess, and it may be that when the reader has read them he will think me wrong. No one can know for certain. But if you are interested in human nature there are few things more diverting than to consider the motives that have resulted in certain actions. It was only by chance that I heard anything of the unhappy circumstances at all. I was spending two or three days on an island on the north coast of Borneo and the District Officer had very kindly offered to put me up. I had been roughing it for some time and I was glad enough to have a rest. The island had been at one time a place of some consequence, with a governor of its own, but was so no longer; and now there was nothing much to be seen of its former importance except the imposing stone house in which the governor had once lived and which now the District Officer, grumblingly because of its unnecessary size, inhabited. But it was a comfortable house to stay in, with an immense drawing-room, a dining-room large enough to seat forty people, and lofty, spacious bedrooms. It was shabby, because the government at Singapore very wisely spent as little money on it as possible; but I rather liked this, and the heavy official furniture gave it a sort of dull stateliness that was amusing. The garden was too large for the District Officer to keep up and it was a wild tangle of tropical vegetation. His name was Arthur Low; he was a quiet, smallish man in the later thirties, married, with two young children. The Lows had not tried to make themselves at home in this great place, but camped there, like

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE A CASUAL AFFAIR I AM telling this story in what is first person, though I am in no way connected with it, because I do not want to pretend to what is reader that I know more about it than I really do. what is facts are as I state them, but what is reasons for them I can only guess, and it may be that when what is reader has read them he will think me wrong. No one can know for certain. But if you are interested in human nature there are few things more diverting than to consider what is motives that have resulted in certain actions. It was only by chance that I heard anything of what is unhappy circumstances at all. I was spending two or three days on an island on what is north coast of Borneo and what is District Officer had very kindly offered to put me up. I had been roughing it for some time and I was glad enough to have a rest. what is island had been at one time a place of some consequence, with a governor of its own, but was so no longer; and now there was nothing much to be seen of its former importance except what is imposing stone house in which what is governor had once lived and which now what is District Officer, grumblingly because of its unnecessary size, inhabited. But it was a comfortable house to stay in, with an immense drawing-room, a dining-room large enough to seat forty people, and lofty, spacious bedrooms. It was shabby, because what is government at Singapore very wisely spent as little money on it as possible; but I rather liked this, and what is heavy official furniture gave it a sort of dull stateliness that was amusing. what is garden was too large for what is District Officer to keep up and it was a wild tangle of tropical vegetation. His name was Arthur Low; he was a quiet, smallish man in what is later thirties, married, with two young children. what is Lows had not tried to make themselves at home in this great place, but camped there, like where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 144 where is p align="center" where is strong A CASUAL AFFAIR where is p align="justify" I AM telling this story in what is first person, though I am in no way connected with it, because I do not want to pretend to the reader that I know more about it than I really do. what is facts are as I state them, but what is reasons for them I can only guess, and it may be that when what is reader has read them he will think me wrong. No one can know for certain. But if you are interested in human nature there are few things more diverting than to consider the motives that have resulted in certain actions. It was only by chance that I heard anything of what is unhappy circumstances at all. I was spending two or three days on an island on what is north coast of Borneo and what is District Officer had very kindly offered to put me up. I had been roughing it for some time and I was glad enough to have a rest. what is island had been at one time a place of some consequence, with a governor of its own, but was so no longer; and now there was nothing much to be seen of its former importance except the imposing stone house in which what is governor had once lived and which now what is District Officer, grumblingly because of its unnecessary size, inhabited. But it was a comfortable house to stay in, with an immense drawing-room, a dining-room large enough to seat forty people, and lofty, spacious bedrooms. It was shabby, because what is government at Singapore very wisely spent as little money on it as possible; but I rather liked this, and what is heavy official furniture gave it a sort of dull stateliness that was amusing. what is garden was too large for what is District Officer to keep up and it was a wild tangle of tropical vegetation. His name was Arthur Low; he was a quiet, smallish man in what is later thirties, married, with two young children. what is Lows had not tried to make themselves at home in this great place, but camped there, like where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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