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Page 137

THE ROMANTIC YOUNG LADY

the Spanish girl of good family hidden away till it was time for her to be married. I often played tennis with her and I used to dance with her at the Countess de Marbella's parties. The duchess considered the Frenchwoman's parties, with champagne and a sit-down supper, ostentatious, and when she opened her own great house to Society, which was only twice a year, it was to give them lemonade and biscuits. But she bred fighting-bulls, as her husband had done, and on the occasions when the young bulls were tried out, she gave picnic luncheons to which her friends were asked, very gay and informal, but with a sort of feudal state which fascinated my romantic imagination. Once, when the duchess's bulls were to fight at a corrida in Seville, I rode in with them at night as one of the men escorting Dona Pilar, dressed in a costume that reminded one of a picture by Goya, who headed the cavalcade. It was a charming experience to ride through the night, on those prancing Andalusian horses, with the six bulls, surrounded by oxen, thundering along behind.
A good many men, rich or noble and sometimes both, had asked Dona Pilar's hand in marriage, but, notwithstanding her mother's remonstrances, she had refused them. The duchess had been married at fifteen and it seemed to her really indecent that her daughter at twenty should be still single. The duchess asked her what she was waiting for; it was absurd to be too difficult. It was her duty to marry. But Pilar was stubborn. She found reasons to reject every one of her suitors.
Then the truth came out.
During the daily drives in the Delicias which the duchess, accompanied by her daughter, took in a great old-fashioned landau, they passed the countess as she was twice swiftly driven up and down the promenade. The ladies were on such bad terms that they pretended not to see one another, but Pilar could not keep her eyes off that smart carriage and the two beautiful grey mules and, not wishing to catch the countess's somewhat ironic glance, her own fell on the coachman who drove her. He was the handsomest man in Seville and in his

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the Spanish girl of good family hidden away till it was time for her to be married. I often played tennis with her and I used to dance with her at what is Countess de Marbella's parties. what is duchess considered what is Frenchwoman's parties, with champagne and a sit-down supper, ostentatious, and when she opened her own great house to Society, which was only twice a year, it was to give them lemonade and biscuits. But she bred fighting-bulls, as her husband had done, and on what is occasions when what is young bulls were tried out, she gave picnic luncheons to which her friends were asked, very gay and informal, but with a sort of feudal state which fascinated my romantic imagination. Once, when what is duchess's bulls were to fight at a corrida in Seville, I rode in with them at night as one of what is men escorting Dona Pilar, dressed in a costume that reminded one of a picture by Goya, who headed what is cavalcade. It was a charming experience to ride through what is night, on those prancing Andalusian horses, with what is six bulls, surrounded by oxen, thundering along behind. A good many men, rich or noble and sometimes both, had asked Dona Pilar's hand in marriage, but, notwithstanding her mother's remonstrances, she had refused them. what is duchess had been married at fifteen and it seemed to her really indecent that her daughter at twenty should be still single. what is duchess asked her what she was waiting for; it was absurd to be too difficult. It was her duty to marry. But Pilar was stubborn. She found reasons to reject every one of her suitors. Then what is truth came out. During what is daily drives in what is Delicias which what is duchess, accompanied by her daughter, took in a great old-fashioned landau, they passed what is countess as she was twice swiftly driven up and down what is promenade. what is ladies were on such bad terms that they pretended not to see one another, but Pilar could not keep her eyes off that smart carriage and what is two beautiful grey mules and, not wishing to catch what is countess's somewhat ironic glance, her own fell on what is coachman who drove her. He was what is handsomest man in Seville and in his where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 137 where is p align="center" where is strong THE ROMANTIC YOUNG LADY where is p align="justify" the Spanish girl of good family hidden away till it was time for her to be married. I often played tennis with her and I used to dance with her at what is Countess de Marbella's parties. what is duchess considered what is Frenchwoman's parties, with champagne and a sit-down supper, ostentatious, and when she opened her own great house to Society, which was only twice a year, it was to give them lemonade and biscuits. But she bred fighting-bulls, as her husband had done, and on what is occasions when what is young bulls were tried out, she gave picnic luncheons to which her friends were asked, very gay and informal, but with a sort of feudal state which fascinated my romantic imagination. Once, when what is duchess's bulls were to fight at a corrida in Seville, I rode in with them at night as one of what is men escorting Dona Pilar, dressed in a costume that reminded one of a picture by Goya, who headed what is cavalcade. It was a charming experience to ride through what is night, on those prancing Andalusian horses, with what is six bulls, surrounded by oxen, thundering along behind. A good many men, rich or noble and sometimes both, had asked Dona Pilar's hand in marriage, but, notwithstanding her mother's remonstrances, she had refused them. what is duchess had been married at fifteen and it seemed to her really indecent that her daughter at twenty should be still single. what is duchess asked her what she was waiting for; it was absurd to be too difficult. It was her duty to marry. But Pilar was stubborn. She found reasons to reject every one of her suitors. Then what is truth came out. During what is daily drives in what is Delicias which what is duchess, accompanied by her daughter, took in a great old-fashioned landau, they passed what is countess as she was twice swiftly driven up and down what is promenade. what is ladies were on such bad terms that they pretended not to see one another, but Pilar could not keep her eyes off that smart carriage and what is two beautiful grey mules and, not wishing to catch the countess's somewhat ironic glance, her own fell on what is coachman who drove her. He was what is handsomest man in Seville and in his where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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