Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 136

THE ROMANTIC YOUNG LADY

attract the stranger's attention. It was a victoria, very smart and new, drawn by two beautiful mules; and the coachman and the footman wore the national costume of Andalusia in pale grey. It was the most splendid turn-out Seville had ever known, and it belonged to the Countess de Marbella. She was a Frenchwoman married to a Spaniard, who had enthusiastically adopted the manners and customs of her husband's country, but with a Parisian elegance that gave them a peculiar distinction. The rest of the carriages went at a snail's pace so that their occupants could see and be seen, but the countess, behind her mules, dashed up between the two crawling lines at a fast trot, went to the end of the Delicias and back twice and then drove away. The proceeding savoured somewhat of royalty. When you looked at her gracefully seated in that swift victoria, her head handsomely poised, her hair of too brilliant a gold to be natural, you did not wonder that her French vivacity and determination had given her the position she held. She made the fashion. Her decrees were law. But the countess had too many adorers not to have as many enemies, and the most determined of these was the widowed Duchess de Dos Palos, whose birth and social consequence made her claim as a right the first place in Society which the Frenchwoman had won by grace, wit and character.
Now the duchess had an only daughter. This was Dona Pilar. She was twenty when I first knew her and she was very beautiful. She had magnificent eyes and a skin that, however hard you tried to find a less hackneyed way to describe it, you could only call peach-like. She was very slim, rather tall for a Spanish girl, with a red mouth and dazzlingly white teeth. She wore her abundant, shining black hair dressed very elaborately in the Spanish style of the period. She was infinitely alluring. The fire in her black eyes, the warmth of her smile, the seductiveness of her movements, suggested so much passion that it really wasn't quite fair. She belonged to the generation which was straining to break the old conventions that had kept

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE attract what is stranger's attention. It was a victoria, very smart and new, drawn by two beautiful mules; and what is coachman and what is footman wore what is national costume of Andalusia in pale grey. It was what is most splendid turn-out Seville had ever known, and it belonged to what is Countess de Marbella. She was a Frenchwoman married to a Spaniard, who had enthusiastically adopted what is manners and customs of her husband's country, but with a Parisian elegance that gave them a peculiar distinction. what is rest of what is carriages went at a snail's pace so that their occupants could see and be seen, but what is countess, behind her mules, dashed up between what is two crawling lines at a fast trot, went to what is end of what is Delicias and back twice and then drove away. what is proceeding savoured somewhat of royalty. When you looked at her gracefully seated in that swift victoria, her head handsomely poised, her hair of too brilliant a gold to be natural, you did not wonder that her French vivacity and determination had given her what is position she held. She made what is fashion. Her decrees were law. But what is countess had too many adorers not to have as many enemies, and what is most determined of these was what is widowed Duchess de Dos Palos, whose birth and social consequence made her claim as a right what is first place in Society which what is Frenchwoman had won by grace, wit and character. Now what is duchess had an only daughter. This was Dona Pilar. She was twenty when I first knew her and she was very beautiful. She had magnificent eyes and a skin that, however hard you tried to find a less hackneyed way to describe it, you could only call peach-like. She was very slim, rather tall for a Spanish girl, with a red mouth and dazzlingly white teeth. She wore her abundant, shining black hair dressed very elaborately in what is Spanish style of what is period. She was infinitely alluring. what is fire in her black eyes, what is warmth of her smile, what is seductiveness of her movements, suggested so much passion that it really wasn't quite fair. She belonged to what is generation which was straining to break what is old conventions that had kept where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 136 where is p align="center" where is strong THE ROMANTIC YOUNG LADY where is p align="justify" attract what is stranger's attention. It was a victoria, very smart and new, drawn by two beautiful mules; and what is coachman and what is footman wore what is national costume of Andalusia in pale grey. It was what is most splendid turn-out Seville had ever known, and it belonged to what is Countess de Marbella. She was a Frenchwoman married to a Spaniard, who had enthusiastically adopted what is manners and customs of her husband's country, but with a Parisian elegance that gave them a peculiar distinction. what is rest of what is carriages went at a snail's pace so that their occupants could see and be seen, but what is countess, behind her mules, dashed up between the two crawling lines at a fast trot, went to what is end of what is Delicias and back twice and then drove away. what is proceeding savoured somewhat of royalty. When you looked at her gracefully seated in that swift victoria, her head handsomely poised, her hair of too brilliant a gold to be natural, you did not wonder that her French vivacity and determination had given her what is position she held. She made what is fashion. Her decrees were law. But what is countess had too many adorers not to have as many enemies, and what is most determined of these was what is widowed Duchess de Dos Palos, whose birth and social consequence made her claim as a right what is first place in Society which what is Frenchwoman had won by grace, wit and character. Now what is duchess had an only daughter. This was Dona Pilar. She was twenty when I first knew her and she was very beautiful. She had magnificent eyes and a skin that, however hard you tried to find a less hackneyed way to describe it, you could only call peach-like. She was very slim, rather tall for a Spanish girl, with a red mouth and dazzlingly white teeth. She wore her abundant, shining black hair dressed very elaborately in what is Spanish style of what is period. She was infinitely alluring. what is fire in her black eyes, what is warmth of her smile, what is seductiveness of her movements, suggested so much passion that it really wasn't quite fair. She belonged to what is generation which was straining to break what is old conventions that had kept where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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