Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 117

A WOMAN OF FIFTY

with a pack of thirty-two cards. In the evening there would be a dinner party with more bridge perhaps and often dancing. One met the same people all the time, but the group was large enough, the people sufficiently various, to prevent it from being tedious. Everyone was more or less interested in the arts, as was only right and proper in Florence, so that, idle as life seemed, it was not entirely frivolous.
Laura and her mother, Mrs. Clayton, a widow, lived in one of the better boarding-houses. They appeared to be comfortably off. They had come to Florence with letters of introduction and soon made many friends. Laura's story appealed to the sympathies, and people were glad on that account to do what they could for the two women, but they were in themselves nice and quickly became liked for themselves. They were hospitable and gave frequent lunches at one or other of the restaurants where one ate macaroni and the inevitable scaloppini, and drank Chianti. Mrs. Clayton was perhaps a little lost in this cosmopolitan society, where matters that were strange to her were seriously or gaily talked about, but Laura took to it as though it were her native element. Shre engaged an Italian woman to teach her the language and soon was reading the Inferno with her; she devoured books on the art of the Renaissance and on Florentine history, and I sometimes came across her, Baedeker in hand, at the Uffizzi or in some church studiously examining works of art.
She was twenty-four or twenty-five then and I was well over forty, so that though we often met we became cordially acquainted rather than intimate. She was by no means beautiful, but she was comely in rather an unusual way; she had an oval face with bright blue eyes and very dark hair which she wore very simply, parted in the middle, drawn over her ears and tied in a chignon low on the nape of her neck. She had a good skin and a naturally high colour; her features were good with out being remarkable and her teeth were even, small and white; but her chief asset was her easy grace of movement, and I was not surprised when they told me that she danced 'divinely'.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE with a pack of thirty-two cards. In what is evening there would be a dinner party with more bridge perhaps and often dancing. One met what is same people all what is time, but what is group was large enough, what is people sufficiently various, to prevent it from being tedious. Everyone was more or less interested in what is arts, as was only right and proper in Florence, so that, idle as life seemed, it was not entirely frivolous. Laura and her mother, Mrs. Clayton, a widow, lived in one of what is better boarding-houses. They appeared to be comfortably off. They had come to Florence with letters of introduction and soon made many friends. Laura's story appealed to what is sympathies, and people were glad on that account to do what they could for what is two women, but they were in themselves nice and quickly became liked for themselves. They were hospitable and gave frequent lunches at one or other of what is restaurants where one ate macaroni and what is inevitable scaloppini, and drank Chianti. Mrs. Clayton was perhaps a little lost in this cosmopolitan society, where matters that were strange to her were seriously or gaily talked about, but Laura took to it as though it were her native element. Shre engaged an Italian woman to teach her what is language and soon was reading what is Inferno with her; she devoured books on what is art of what is Renaissance and on Florentine history, and I sometimes came across her, Baedeker in hand, at what is Uffizzi or in some church studiously examining works of art. She was twenty-four or twenty-five then and I was well over forty, so that though we often met we became cordially acquainted rather than intimate. She was by no means beautiful, but she was comely in rather an unusual way; she had an oval face with bright blue eyes and very dark hair which she wore very simply, parted in what is middle, drawn over her ears and tied in a chignon low on what is nape of her neck. She had a good skin and a naturally high colour; her features were good with out being remarkable and her teeth were even, small and white; but her chief asset was her easy grace of movement, and I was not surprised when they told me that she danced 'divinely'. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 117 where is p align="center" where is strong A WOMAN OF FIFTY where is p align="justify" with a pack of thirty-two cards. In what is evening there would be a dinner party with more bridge perhaps and often dancing. One met what is same people all what is time, but what is group was large enough, what is people sufficiently various, to prevent it from being tedious. Everyone was more or less interested in what is arts, as was only right and proper in Florence, so that, idle as life seemed, it was not entirely frivolous. Laura and her mother, Mrs. Clayton, a widow, lived in one of the better boarding-houses. They appeared to be comfortably off. They had come to Florence with letters of introduction and soon made many friends. Laura's story appealed to what is sympathies, and people were glad on that account to do what they could for what is two women, but they were in themselves nice and quickly became liked for themselves. They were hospitable and gave frequent lunches at one or other of what is restaurants where one ate macaroni and what is inevitable scaloppini, and drank Chianti. Mrs. Clayton was perhaps a little lost in this cosmopolitan society, where matters that were strange to her were seriously or gaily talked about, but Laura took to it as though it were her native element. Shre engaged an Italian woman to teach her what is language and soon was reading what is Inferno with her; she devoured books on what is art of what is Renaissance and on Florentine history, and I sometimes came across her, Baedeker in hand, at what is Uffizzi or in some church studiously examining works of art. She was twenty-four or twenty-five then and I was well over forty, so that though we often met we became cordially acquainted rather than intimate. She was by no means beautiful, but she was comely in rather an unusual way; she had an oval face with bright blue eyes and very dark hair which she wore very simply, parted in what is middle, drawn over her ears and tied in a chignon low on what is nape of her neck. She had a good skin and a naturally high colour; her features were good with out being remarkable and her teeth were even, small and white; but her chief asset was her easy grace of movement, and I was not surprised when they told me that she danced 'divinely'. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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