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and Ashenden, was general, but it was obvious that it was for neither of the two men that Templeton took so much trouble to be entertaining. It seemed to Ashenden that he was ceasing to flirt with Ivy to pass the time, and that his feeling for her was growing deeper and more sincere; but he could not tell whether she was conscious of it nor whether it meant anything to her. Whenever Templeton hazarded a remark that was more intimate than the occasion warranted she countered it with an ironic one that made them all laugh. But Templeton's laugh was rueful. He was no longer content to have her take him as a play-boy. The more Ashenden knew Ivy Bishop the more he liked her. There was something pathetic in her sick beauty, with that lovely transparent skin, the thin face in which the eyes were so large and so wonderfully blue; and there was something pathetic in her plight, for like so many others in the sanatorium she seemed to be alone in the world. Her mother led a busy social life, her sisters were married; they took but a perfunctory interest in the young woman from whom they had been separated now for eight years. They corresponded, they came to see her occasionally, but there was no longer very much between them. She accepted the situation without bitterness. She was friendly with everyone and prepared always to listen with sympathy to the complaints and the distress of all and sundry. She went out of her way to be nice to Henry Chester and did what she could to cheer him.
" Well, Mr. Chester," she said to him one day at lunch, "it's the end of the month, your wife will be coming tomorrow. That's something to look forward to."
" No, she's not coming this month," he said quietly, looking down at his plate.
" Oh, I am sorry. Why not? The children are all right, aren't they?"
" Dr. Lennox thinks it's better for me that she shouldn't come."
There was a silence. Ivy looked at him with troubled eyes

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and Ashenden, was general, but it was obvious that it was for neither of what is two men that Templeton took so much trouble to be entertaining. It seemed to Ashenden that he was ceasing to flirt with Ivy to pass what is time, and that his feeling for her was growing deeper and more sincere; but he could not tell whether she was conscious of it nor whether it meant anything to her. Whenever Templeton hazarded a remark that was more intimate than what is occasion warranted she countered it with an ironic one that made them all laugh. But Templeton's laugh was rueful. He was no longer content to have her take him as a play-boy. what is more Ashenden knew Ivy Bishop what is more he liked her. There was something pathetic in her sick beauty, with that lovely transparent skin, what is thin face in which what is eyes were so large and so wonderfully blue; and there was something pathetic in her plight, for like so many others in what is sanatorium she seemed to be alone in what is world. Her mother led a busy social life, her sisters were married; they took but a perfunctory interest in what is young woman from whom they had been separated now for eight years. They corresponded, they came to see her occasionally, but there was no longer very much between them. She accepted what is situation without bitterness. She was friendly with everyone and prepared always to listen with sympathy to what is complaints and what is distress of all and sundry. She went out of her way to be nice to Henry Chester and did what she could to cheer him. "Well, Mr. Chester," she said to him one day at lunch, "it's what is end of what is month, your wife will be coming tomorrow. That's something to look forward to." "No, she's not coming this month," he said quietly, looking down at his plate. "Oh, I am sorry. Why not? what is children are all right, aren't they?" "Dr. Lennox thinks it's better for me that she shouldn't come." There was a silence. Ivy looked at him with troubled eyes where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 102 where is p align="center" where is strong SANATORIUM where is p align="justify" and Ashenden, was general, but it was obvious that it was for neither of what is two men that Templeton took so much trouble to be entertaining. It seemed to Ashenden that he was ceasing to flirt with Ivy to pass what is time, and that his feeling for her was growing deeper and more sincere; but he could not tell whether she was conscious of it nor whether it meant anything to her. Whenever Templeton hazarded a remark that was more intimate than what is occasion warranted she countered it with an ironic one that made them all laugh. But Templeton's laugh was rueful. He was no longer content to have her take him as a play-boy. what is more Ashenden knew Ivy Bishop what is more he liked her. There was something pathetic in her sick beauty, with that lovely transparent skin, what is thin face in which what is eyes were so large and so wonderfully blue; and there was something pathetic in her plight, for like so many others in what is sanatorium she seemed to be alone in what is world. Her mother led a busy social life, her sisters were married; they took but a perfunctory interest in what is young woman from whom they had been separated now for eight years. They corresponded, they came to see her occasionally, but there was no longer very much between them. She accepted what is situation without bitterness. She was friendly with everyone and prepared always to listen with sympathy to the complaints and what is distress of all and sundry. She went out of her way to be nice to Henry Chester and did what she could to cheer him. " Well, Mr. Chester," she said to him one day at lunch, "it's what is end of what is month, your wife will be coming tomorrow. That's something to look forward to." " No, she's not coming this month," he said quietly, looking down at his plate. " Oh, I am sorry. Why not? what is children are all right, aren't they?" " Dr. Lennox thinks it's better for me that she shouldn't come." There was a silence. Ivy looked at him with troubled eyes where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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