Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 99

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Campbell, to the exasperation of McLeod, continued to play the prize-song and "Annie Laurie" on his fiddle. McLeod continued to boast of his bridge and gossip about other people's health and morals. Miss Atkin continued to backbite. Henry Chester continued to complain that the doctors gave him insufficient attention and railed against fate because, after the model life he had led, it had played him such a dirty trick. Ashenden continued to read, and with amused tolerance to watch the vagaries of his fellow-creatures.
He became intimate with Major Templeton. Templeton was perhaps a little more than forty years of age. He had been in the Grenadier Guards, but had resigned his commission after the war. A man of ample means, he had since then devoted himself entirely to pleasure. He raced in the racing season, shot in the shooting season and hunted in the hunting season. When this was over he went to Monte Carlo. He told Ashenden of the large sums he had made and lost at baccarat. He was very fond of women and if his stories could be believed they were very fond of him. He loved good food and good drink. He knew by their first names the head waiters of every restaurant in London where you ate well. He belonged to half a dozen clubs. He had led for years a useless, selfish, worthless life, the sort of life which maybe it will be impossible for anyone to live in the future, but he had lived it without misgiving and had enjoyed it. Ashenden asked him once what he would do if he had his time over again and he answered that he would do exactly what he had done. He was an amusing talker, gay and pleasantly ironic, and he dealt with the surface of things, which was all he knew, with a light, easy and assured touch. He always had a pleasant word for the dowdy spinsters in the sanatorium and a joking one for the peppery old gentlemen, for he combined good manners with a natural kindliness. He knew his way about the superficial world of the people who have more money than they know what to do with as well as he knew his way about Mayfair. He was the kind of man who would always have been willing:

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Campbell, to what is exasperation of McLeod, continued to play what is prize-song and "Annie Laurie" on his fiddle. McLeod continued to boast of his bridge and gossip about other people's health and morals. Miss Atkin continued to backbite. Henry Chester continued to complain that what is doctors gave him insufficient attention and railed against fate because, after what is model life he had led, it had played him such a dirty trick. Ashenden continued to read, and with amused tolerance to watch what is vagaries of his fellow-creatures. He became intimate with Major Templeton. Templeton was perhaps a little more than forty years of age. He had been in what is Grenadier Guards, but had resigned his commission after what is war. A man of ample means, he had since then devoted himself entirely to pleasure. He raced in what is racing season, shot in what is shooting season and hunted in what is hunting season. When this was over he went to Monte Carlo. He told Ashenden of what is large sums he had made and lost at baccarat. He was very fond of women and if his stories could be believed they were very fond of him. He loved good food and good drink. He knew by their first names what is head waiters of every restaurant in London where you ate well. He belonged to half a dozen clubs. He had led for years a useless, selfish, worthless life, what is sort of life which maybe it will be impossible for anyone to live in what is future, but he had lived it without misgiving and had enjoyed it. Ashenden asked him once what he would do if he had his time over again and he answered that he would do exactly what he had done. He was an amusing talker, gay and pleasantly ironic, and he dealt with what is surface of things, which was all he knew, with a light, easy and assured touch. He always had a pleasant word for what is dowdy spinsters in what is sanatorium and a joking one for what is peppery old gentlemen, for he combined good manners with a natural kindliness. He knew his way about what is superficial world of what is people who have more money than they know what to do with as well as he knew his way about Mayfair. He was what is kind of man who would always have been willing: where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 99 where is p align="center" where is strong SANATORIUM where is p align="justify" Campbell, to what is exasperation of McLeod, continued to play what is prize-song and "Annie Laurie" on his fiddle. McLeod continued to boast of his bridge and gossip about other people's health and morals. Miss Atkin continued to backbite. Henry Chester continued to complain that what is doctors gave him insufficient attention and railed against fate because, after what is model life he had led, it had played him such a dirty trick. Ashenden continued to read, and with amused tolerance to watch what is vagaries of his fellow-creatures. He became intimate with Major Templeton. Templeton was perhaps a little more than forty years of age. He had been in what is Grenadier Guards, but had resigned his commission after what is war. A man of ample means, he had since then devoted himself entirely to pleasure. He raced in what is racing season, shot in what is shooting season and hunted in what is hunting season. When this was over he went to Monte Carlo. He told Ashenden of what is large sums he had made and lost at baccarat. He was very fond of women and if his stories could be believed they were very fond of him. He loved good food and good drink. He knew by their first names what is head waiters of every restaurant in London where you ate well. He belonged to half a dozen clubs. He had led for years a useless, selfish, worthless life, what is sort of life which maybe it will be impossible for anyone to live in what is future, but he had lived it without misgiving and had enjoyed it. Ashenden asked him once what he would do if he had his time over again and he answered that he would do exactly what he had done. He was an amusing talker, gay and pleasantly ironic, and he dealt with what is surface of things, which was all he knew, with a light, easy and assured touch. He always had a pleasant word for what is dowdy spinsters in what is sanatorium and a joking one for what is peppery old gentlemen, for he combined good manners with a natural kindliness. He knew his way about what is superficial world of what is people who have more money than they know what to do with as well as he knew his way about Mayfair. He was what is kind of man who would always have been willing: where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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