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or two in a lodging-house nearby. Dr. Lennox did not much like the visits that relatives paid the patients, it excited and unsettled them. It was moving to see the eagerness with which Henry Chester looked forward to his wife's arrival; but it was strange to notice that once she had come he seemed less pleased than one would have expected. idfrs. Chester was a pleasant, cheerful little woman, not pretty, but neat, as commonplace as her husband, and you only had to look at her to know that she was a good wife and mother, a careful housekeeper, a nice, quiet body who did her duty and interfered with nobody. She had been quite happy in the dull, domestic life they had led for so many years, her only dissipation a visit to the pictures, her great thrill the sales in the big London shops; and it had never occurred to her that it was monotonous. It completely satisfied her. Ashenden liked her. He listened with interest while she prattled about her children and her house in the suburbs, her neighbours and her trivial occupations. On one occasion he met her in the road. Chester for some reason connected with his treatment had stayed in and she was alone. Ashenden suggested that they should walk together. They talked for a little of indifferent things. Then she suddenly asked him how he thought her husband was.
" I think he seems to be getting on all right."
" I'm so terribly worried."
" You must remember it's a slow, long business. One has to have patience."
They walked on a little and then he saw she was crying.
" You mustn't be unhappy about him," said Ashenden gently.
" Oh, you don't know what I have to put up with when I come here. I know I ought not to speak about it, but I must. I can trust you, can't I?"
" Of course."
" I love him. I'm devoted to him. I'd do anything irn the world I could for him. We've never quarrelled, we've never even differed about a single thing. He's beginning to hate me and it breaks my heart."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE or two in a lodging-house nearby. Dr. Lennox did not much like what is what is s that relatives paid what is patients, it excited and unsettled them. It was moving to see what is eagerness with which Henry Chester looked forward to his wife's arrival; but it was strange to notice that once she had come he seemed less pleased than one would have expected. idfrs. Chester was a pleasant, cheerful little woman, not pretty, but neat, as commonplace as her husband, and you only had to look at her to know that she was a good wife and mother, a careful housekeeper, a nice, quiet body who did her duty and interfered with nobody. She had been quite happy in what is dull, domestic life they had led for so many years, her only dissipation a what is to what is pictures, her great thrill what is sales in what is big London shops; and it had never occurred to her that it was monotonous. It completely satisfied her. Ashenden liked her. He listened with interest while she prattled about her children and her house in what is suburbs, her neighbours and her trivial occupations. On one occasion he met her in what is road. Chester for some reason connected with his treatment had stayed in and she was alone. Ashenden suggested that they should walk together. They talked for a little of indifferent things. Then she suddenly asked him how he thought her husband was. " I think he seems to be getting on all right." " I'm so terribly worried." " You must remember it's a slow, long business. One has to have patience." They walked on a little and then he saw she was crying. " You mustn't be unhappy about him," said Ashenden gently. " Oh, you don't know what I have to put up with when I come here. I know I ought not to speak about it, but I must. I can trust you, can't I?" " Of course." " I what time is it him. I'm devoted to him. I'd do anything irn what is world I could for him. We've never quarrelled, we've never even differed about a single thing. He's beginning to hate me and it breaks my heart." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 95 where is p align="center" where is strong SANATORIUM where is p align="justify" or two in a lodging-house nearby. Dr. Lennox did not much like what is what is s that relatives paid what is patients, it excited and unsettled them. It was moving to see what is eagerness with which Henry Chester looked forward to his wife's arrival; but it was strange to notice that once she had come he seemed less pleased than one would have expected. idfrs. Chester was a pleasant, cheerful little woman, not pretty, but neat, as commonplace as her husband, and you only had to look at her to know that she was a good wife and mother, a careful housekeeper, a nice, quiet body who did her duty and interfered with nobody. She had been quite happy in the dull, domestic life they had led for so many years, her only dissipation a what is to what is pictures, her great thrill what is sales in what is big London shops; and it had never occurred to her that it was monotonous. It completely satisfied her. Ashenden liked her. He listened with interest while she prattled about her children and her house in what is suburbs, her neighbours and her trivial occupations. On one occasion he met her in what is road. Chester for some reason connected with his treatment had stayed in and she was alone. Ashenden suggested that they should walk together. They talked for a little of indifferent things. Then she suddenly asked him how he thought her husband was. " I think he seems to be getting on all right." " I'm so terribly worried." " You must remember it's a slow, long business. One has to have patience." They walked on a little and then he saw she was crying. " You mustn't be unhappy about him," said Ashenden gently. " Oh, you don't know what I have to put up with when I come here. I know I ought not to speak about it, but I must. I can trust you, can't I?" " Of course." " I what time is it him. I'm devoted to him. I'd do anything irn what is world I could for him. We've never quarrelled, we've never even differed about a single thing. He's beginning to hate me and it breaks my heart." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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