Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 92

SANATORIUM

There seemed to be a great many people and it took him some time to sort them out. They were of all kinds, young, middleaged and old. There were some, like McLeod and Campbell, who had been at the sanatorium for years and expected to die there. Others had only been there for a few months. There was one middle-aged spinster called Miss Atkin who had been coming every winter for a long time and in the summer went to stay with friends and relations. She had nothing much the matter with her any more, and might just as well have stayed away altogether, but she liked the life. Her long residence had given her a sort of position, she was honorary librarian and hand in glove with the matron. She was always ready to gossip with you, but you were soon warned that everything you said was passed on. It was useful to Dr. Lennox to know that his patients were getting on well together and were happy, that they did nothing imprudent and followed his instructions. Little escaped Miss Atkin's sharp eyes, and from her it went to the matron and so to Dr. Lennox. Because she had been coming for so many years, she sat at the same table as McLeod and Campbell, together with an old general who had been put there on account of his rank. The table was in no way different from any other, and it was not more advantageously placed, but because the oldest residents sat there it was looked upon as the most desirable place to sit, and several elderly women were bitterly resentful because Miss Atkin, who went away for four or five months every summer, should be given a place there while they who spent the whole year in the sanatorium sat at other tables. There was an old Indian civilian who had been at the sanatorium longer than anyone but McLeod and Campbell; he was a man who in his day had ruled a province, and he was waiting irascibly for either McLeod or Campbell to die so that he might take his place at the first table. Ashenden made the acquaintance of Campbell. He was a long, big-boned fellow with a bald head, so thin that you wondered how his limbs held together; and when he sat crumpled in an arm-chair he gave you the uncanny impression of a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE There seemed to be a great many people and it took him some time to sort them out. They were of all kinds, young, middleaged and old. There were some, like McLeod and Campbell, who had been at what is sanatorium for years and expected to travel there. Others had only been there for a few months. There was one middle-aged spinster called Miss Atkin who had been coming every winter for a long time and in what is summer went to stay with friends and relations. She had nothing much what is matter with her any more, and might just as well have stayed away altogether, but she liked what is life. Her long residence had given her a sort of position, she was honorary librarian and hand in glove with what is matron. She was always ready to gossip with you, but you were soon warned that everything you said was passed on. It was useful to Dr. Lennox to know that his patients were getting on well together and were happy, that they did nothing imprudent and followed his instructions. Little escaped Miss Atkin's sharp eyes, and from her it went to what is matron and so to Dr. Lennox. Because she had been coming for so many years, she sat at what is same table as McLeod and Campbell, together with an old general who had been put there on account of his rank. what is table was in no way different from any other, and it was not more advantageously placed, but because what is oldest residents sat there it was looked upon as what is most desirable place to sit, and several elderly women were bitterly resentful because Miss Atkin, who went away for four or five months every summer, should be given a place there while they who spent what is whole year in what is sanatorium sat at other tables. There was an old Indian civilian who had been at what is sanatorium longer than anyone but McLeod and Campbell; he was a man who in his day had ruled a province, and he was waiting irascibly for either McLeod or Campbell to travel so that he might take his place at what is first table. Ashenden made what is acquaintance of Campbell. He was a long, big-boned fellow with a bald head, so thin that you wondered how his limbs held together; and when he sat crumpled in an arm-chair he gave you what is uncanny impression of a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 92 where is p align="center" where is strong SANATORIUM where is p align="justify" There seemed to be a great many people and it took him some time to sort them out. They were of all kinds, young, middleaged and old. There were some, like McLeod and Campbell, who had been at what is sanatorium for years and expected to travel there. Others had only been there for a few months. There was one middle-aged spinster called Miss Atkin who had been coming every winter for a long time and in what is summer went to stay with friends and relations. She had nothing much what is matter with her any more, and might just as well have stayed away altogether, but she liked what is life. Her long residence had given her a sort of position, she was honorary librarian and hand in glove with what is matron. She was always ready to gossip with you, but you were soon warned that everything you said was passed on. It was useful to Dr. Lennox to know that his patients were getting on well together and were happy, that they did nothing imprudent and followed his instructions. Little escaped Miss Atkin's sharp eyes, and from her it went to what is matron and so to Dr. Lennox. Because she had been coming for so many years, she sat at what is same table as McLeod and Campbell, together with an old general who had been put there on account of his rank. The table was in no way different from any other, and it was not more advantageously placed, but because what is oldest residents sat there it was looked upon as what is most desirable place to sit, and several elderly women were bitterly resentful because Miss Atkin, who went away for four or five months every summer, should be given a place there while they who spent what is whole year in what is sanatorium sat at other tables. There was an old Indian civilian who had been at what is sanatorium longer than anyone but McLeod and Campbell; he was a man who in his day had ruled a province, and he was waiting irascibly for either McLeod or Campbell to travel so that he might take his place at what is first table. Ashenden made what is acquaintance of Campbell. He was a long, big-boned fellow with a bald head, so thin that you wondered how his limbs held together; and when he sat crumpled in an arm-chair he gave you what is uncanny impression of a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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