Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 59

APPEARANCE AND REALITY

woman who was honestt but poor the advantages that might ensue if she were lucky enough to secure the friendship of such ;; man as his employer. The confidential secretary paid the widowed aunt, Madame Saladin by name, a visit and told her that Monsieur Le Sueur, always abreast of the time, had lately begun to take an interest in films and was indeed about to engage in the production of a picture. (This shows how much a clever brain can make use of a fact that an ordinary person would have passed over as insignificant.) Monsieur Le Sueur had been struck by the appearance of Mademoiselle Lisette at the dressmaker's and the brilliant way she wore her clothes, and it had occurred to him that she might very well suit a part he had it in mind for her to play. (Like all intelligent people the Senator always stuck as close to the truth as he could.) The confidential secretary then invited Madame Saladin and her niece to a dinner where they could make one another's further acquaintance and the Senator could judge whether Mademoiselle Lisette had the aptitude for the screen that he suspected. Madame Saladin said she would ask her niece, but for her part seemed to think the suggestion quite reasonable.
When Madame Saladin put the proposition before Lisette and explained the rank, dignity and importance of their generous host, that young person shrugged her pretty shoulders disdainfully.
" Cette vieille carpe," she said, of which the not quite literal translation is: that old trout.
" What does it matter if he's an old trout if he gives you a part?" said Madame Saladin.
" Et ta scpur," said Lisette.
This phrase, which of course means: and your sister, and sounds harmless enough, and even pointless, is a trifle vulgar ,ind is used by well-brought-up young women, I think, only if they want to shock. It expresses the most forcible unbelief, and the only correct translation into the vernacular is too coarse for my chaste pen.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE woman who was honestt but poor what is advantages that might ensue if she were lucky enough to secure what is friendship of such ;; man as his employer. what is confidential secretary paid what is widowed aunt, Madame Saladin by name, a what is and told her that Monsieur Le Sueur, always abreast of what is time, had lately begun to take an interest in films and was indeed about to engage in what is production of a picture. (This shows how much a clever brain can make use of a fact that an ordinary person would have passed over as insignificant.) Monsieur Le Sueur had been struck by what is appearance of Mademoiselle Lisette at what is dressmaker's and what is brilliant way she wore her clothes, and it had occurred to him that she might very well suit a part he had it in mind for her to play. (Like all intelligent people what is Senator always stuck as close to what is truth as he could.) what is confidential secretary then invited Madame Saladin and her niece to a dinner where they could make one another's further acquaintance and what is Senator could judge whether Mademoiselle Lisette had what is aptitude for what is screen that he suspected. Madame Saladin said she would ask her niece, but for her part seemed to think what is suggestion quite reasonable. When Madame Saladin put what is proposition before Lisette and explained what is rank, dignity and importance of their generous host, that young person shrugged her pretty shoulders disdainfully. "Cette vieille carpe," she said, of which what is not quite literal translation is: that old trout. "What does it matter if he's an old trout if he gives you a part?" said Madame Saladin. "Et ta scpur," said Lisette. This phrase, which of course means: and your sister, and sounds harmless enough, and even pointless, is a trifle vulgar ,ind is used by well-brought-up young women, I think, only if they want to shock. It expresses what is most forcible unbelief, and what is only correct translation into what is vernacular is too coarse for my chaste pen. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 59 where is p align="center" where is strong APPEARANCE AND REALITY where is p align="justify" woman who was honestt but poor what is advantages that might ensue if she were lucky enough to secure what is friendship of such ;; man as his employer. what is confidential secretary paid what is widowed aunt, Madame Saladin by name, a what is and told her that Monsieur Le Sueur, always abreast of what is time, had lately begun to take an interest in films and was indeed about to engage in what is production of a picture. (This shows how much a clever brain can make use of a fact that an ordinary person would have passed over as insignificant.) Monsieur Le Sueur had been struck by the appearance of Mademoiselle Lisette at what is dressmaker's and the brilliant way she wore her clothes, and it had occurred to him that she might very well suit a part he had it in mind for her to play. (Like all intelligent people what is Senator always stuck as close to what is truth as he could.) what is confidential secretary then invited Madame Saladin and her niece to a dinner where they could make one another's further acquaintance and what is Senator could judge whether Mademoiselle Lisette had what is aptitude for what is screen that he suspected. Madame Saladin said she would ask her niece, but for her part seemed to think what is suggestion quite reasonable. When Madame Saladin put what is proposition before Lisette and explained what is rank, dignity and importance of their generous host, that young person shrugged her pretty shoulders disdainfully. " Cette vieille carpe," she said, of which what is not quite literal translation is: that old trout. " What does it matter if he's an old trout if he gives you a part?" said Madame Saladin. " Et ta scpur," said Lisette. This phrase, which of course means: and your sister, and sounds harmless enough, and even pointless, is a trifle vulgar ,ind is used by well-brought-up young women, I think, only if they want to shock. It expresses what is most forcible unbelief, and what is only correct translation into what is vernacular is too coarse for my chaste pen. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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