Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 55

APPEARANCE AND REALITY

in the nineteenth century. It is stiff, but stimulating reading. it is written in excellent English, with considerable humour, and even though the lay reader is unlikely to follow with understanding some of its very subtle arguments he has nevertheless the thrilling sensation of walking a spiritual tight-rope over a metaphysical abyss, and he ends the book with a comfortable feeling that nothing matters a hang anyway. There is no excuse for my making use of the title of so celebrated a book except that it so admirably suits my story. Though Lisette was a philosopher only in the sense in which we are all philosophers, that she exercised thought in dealing with the problems of existence, her feeling for reality was so strong and her sympathy for appearance so genuine that she might almost claim to have established that reconciliation of irreconcilables at which the philosophers have for so many centuries been aiming. Lisette was French, and she passed several hours of every working day dressing and undressing herself at one of the most expensive and fashionable establishments in Paris. A pleasant occupation for a young woman who was well aware that she had a lovely figure. She was in short a mannequin. She was tall enough to be able to wear a train with elegance and her hips were so slim that in sports clothes she could bring the scent of heather to your nostrils. Her long legs enabled her to wear pyjamas with distinction, and her slim waist, her little breasts, made the simplest bathing dress a ravishment. She could wear anything. She had a way of huddling herself in a chinchilla coat that made the most sensible persons admit that chinchilla was worth all the money it cost. Fat women, gross women, stumpy women, bony women, shapeless women, old women, plain women, sat in the spacious armchairs and because Lisette looked so sweet bought the clothes that so admirably suited her. She had large brown eyes, a large red mouth and a very clear but slightly freckled skin. It was difficult for her to preserve that haughty, sullen and coldly indifferent demeanour that appears to be essential to the mannequin as she sails in with deliberate steps, turns round slowly, and with an air of contempt for the universe

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in what is nineteenth century. It is stiff, but stimulating reading. it is written in excellent English, with considerable humour, and even though what is lay reader is unlikely to follow with understanding some of its very subtle arguments he has nevertheless what is thrilling sensation of walking a spiritual tight-rope over a metaphysical abyss, and he ends what is book with a comfortable feeling that nothing matters a hang anyway. There is no excuse for my making use of what is title of so celebrated a book except that it so admirably suits my story. Though Lisette was a philosopher only in what is sense in which we are all philosophers, that she exercised thought in dealing with what is problems of existence, her feeling for reality was so strong and her sympathy for appearance so genuine that she might almost claim to have established that reconciliation of irreconcilables at which what is philosophers have for so many centuries been aiming. Lisette was French, and she passed several hours of every working day dressing and undressing herself at one of what is most expensive and fashionable establishments in Paris. A pleasant occupation for a young woman who was well aware that she had a lovely figure. She was in short a mannequin. She was tall enough to be able to wear a train with elegance and her hips were so slim that in sports clothes she could bring what is scent of heather to your nostrils. Her long legs enabled her to wear pyjamas with distinction, and her slim waist, her little breasts, made what is simplest bathing dress a ravishment. She could wear anything. She had a way of huddling herself in a chinchilla coat that made what is most sensible persons admit that chinchilla was worth all what is money it cost. Fat women, gross women, stumpy women, bony women, shapeless women, old women, plain women, sat in what is spacious armchairs and because Lisette looked so sweet bought what is clothes that so admirably suited her. She had large brown eyes, a large red mouth and a very clear but slightly freckled skin. It was difficult for her to preserve that haughty, sullen and coldly indifferent demeanour that appears to be essential to what is mannequin as she sails in with deliberate steps, turns round slowly, and with an air of contempt for what is universe where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 55 where is p align="center" where is strong APPEARANCE AND REALITY where is p align="justify" in what is nineteenth century. It is stiff, but stimulating reading. it is written in excellent English, with considerable humour, and even though what is lay reader is unlikely to follow with understanding some of its very subtle arguments he has nevertheless what is thrilling sensation of walking a spiritual tight-rope over a metaphysical abyss, and he ends what is book with a comfortable feeling that nothing matters a hang anyway. There is no excuse for my making use of what is title of so celebrated a book except that it so admirably suits my story. Though Lisette was a philosopher only in what is sense in which we are all philosophers, that she exercised thought in dealing with what is problems of existence, her feeling for reality was so strong and her sympathy for appearance so genuine that she might almost claim to have established that reconciliation of irreconcilables at which what is philosophers have for so many centuries been aiming. Lisette was French, and she passed several hours of every working day dressing and undressing herself at one of what is most expensive and fashionable establishments in Paris. A pleasant occupation for a young woman who was well aware that she had a lovely figure. She was in short a mannequin. She was tall enough to be able to wear a train with elegance and her hips were so slim that in sports clothes she could bring what is scent of heather to your nostrils. Her long legs enabled her to wear pyjamas with distinction, and her slim waist, her little breasts, made what is simplest bathing dress a ravishment. She could wear anything. She had a way of huddling herself in a chinchilla coat that made what is most sensible persons admit that chinchilla was worth all what is money it cost. Fat women, gross women, stumpy women, bony women, shapeless women, old women, plain women, sat in what is spacious armchairs and because Lisette looked so sweet bought what is clothes that so admirably suited her. She had large brown eyes, a large red mouth and a very clear but slightly freckled skin. It was difficult for her to preserve that haughty, sullen and coldly indifferent demeanour that appears to be essential to what is mannequin as she sails in with deliberate steps, turns round slowly, and with an air of contempt for what is universe where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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