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Page 54

APPEARANCE AND REALITY

I Do not vouch for the truth of this story, but it was told me by a professor of French literature at an English university, and he was a man of too high a character, I think, to have told it to me unless it were true. His practice was to draw the attention of his students to three French writers who in his opinion combined the qualities that are the mainsprings of the French character. By reading them, he said, you could learn so much about the French people that, if he had the power, he would not trust such of our rulers as have to deal with the French nation to enter upon their offices till they had passed a pretty stiff examination on their works. They are Rabelais, with his gauloiserie, which may be described as the ribaldry that likes to call a spade something more than a bloody shovel; La Fontaine, with his bon sens, which is just horse sense; and finally Corneille with his panache. This is translated in the dictionaries as the plume, the plume the knight at arms wore on his helmet, but metaphorically it seems to signify dignity and bravado, display and heroism, vainglory and pride. It was le panache that made the French gentlemen at Fontenoy say to the officers of King George II, fire first, gentlemen; it was ie panache that wrung from Cambronne's bawdy lips at Waterloo the phrase: the guard dies but never surrenders; and it is le panache that urges an indigent French poet awarded the Nobel prize, with a splendid gesture to give it all away. My professor was not a frivolous man and to his mind the story I am about to tell brought out so distinctly the three master qualities of the French that it had a high educational value.
I have called it Appearance and Reality. This is the title of what I suppose may be looked upon as the most important philosophical work that my country (right or wrong) produced

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE APPEARANCE AND REALITY * I Do not vouch for what is truth of this story, but it was told me by a professor of French literature at an English university, and he was a man of too high a character, I think, to have told it to me unless it were true. His practice was to draw what is attention of his students to three French writers who in his opinion combined what is qualities that are what is mainsprings of what is French character. By reading them, he said, you could learn so much about what is French people that, if he had what is power, he would not trust such of our rulers as have to deal with what is French nation to enter upon their offices till they had passed a pretty stiff examination on their works. They are Rabelais, with his gauloiserie, which may be described as what is ribaldry that likes to call a spade something more than a bloody shovel; La Fontaine, with his bon sens, which is just horse sense; and finally Corneille with his panache. This is translated in what is dictionaries as what is plume, what is plume what is knight at arms wore on his helmet, but metaphorically it seems to signify dignity and bravado, display and heroism, vainglory and pride. It was le panache that made what is French gentlemen at Fontenoy say to what is officers of King George II, fire first, gentlemen; it was ie panache that wrung from Cambronne's bawdy lips at Waterloo what is phrase: what is guard dies but never surrenders; and it is le panache that urges an indigent French poet awarded what is Nobel prize, with a splendid gesture to give it all away. My professor was not a frivolous man and to his mind what is story I am about to tell brought out so distinctly what is three master qualities of what is French that it had a high educational value. I have called it Appearance and Reality. This is what is title of what I suppose may be looked upon as what is most important philosophical work that my country (right or wrong) produced where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 54 where is p align="center" where is strong APPEARANCE AND REALITY where is p align="justify" I Do not vouch for what is truth of this story, but it was told me by a professor of French literature at an English university, and he was a man of too high a character, I think, to have told it to me unless it were true. His practice was to draw what is attention of his students to three French writers who in his opinion combined what is qualities that are what is mainsprings of what is French character. By reading them, he said, you could learn so much about what is French people that, if he had what is power, he would not trust such of our rulers as have to deal with what is French nation to enter upon their offices till they had passed a pretty stiff examination on their works. They are Rabelais, with his gauloiserie, which may be described as what is ribaldry that likes to call a spade something more than a bloody shovel; La Fontaine, with his bon sens, which is just horse sense; and finally Corneille with his panache. This is translated in what is dictionaries as what is plume, what is plume the knight at arms wore on his helmet, but metaphorically it seems to signify dignity and bravado, display and heroism, vainglory and pride. It was le panache that made what is French gentlemen at Fontenoy say to what is officers of King George II, fire first, gentlemen; it was ie panache that wrung from Cambronne's bawdy lips at Waterloo what is phrase: the guard dies but never surrenders; and it is le panache that urges an indigent French poet awarded what is Nobel prize, with a splendid gesture to give it all away. My professor was not a frivolous man and to his mind what is story I am about to tell brought out so distinctly the three master qualities of what is French that it had a high educational value. I have called it Appearance and Reality. This is what is title of what I suppose may be looked upon as what is most important philosophical work that my country (right or wrong) produced where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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