Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 47

FLOTSAM AND JETSAM

married. It had been made by a native carpenter, of course, and they had had the mirror sent from Singapore, but it was rnade to her own design, of the exact size and shape she wanted, with plenty of room for all her toilet things and her make-up. It was the dressing-table she had hankered after for donkey's years and had never had. She remembered still how pleased she was when first she had it. She threw her arms round her husband's neck and kissed him.
" Oh, Norman, you are good to me," she said. "I'm a lucky little girl to have caught a chap like you, aren't I?"
But then everything delighted her. She was amused by the river life and the life of the jungle, the teeming growth of the forest, the birds with their gay plumage and the brilliant butterflies. She set about giving the house a woman's touch; she put out all her own photographs and she got vases to put flowers in; she routed around and got a lot of knick-knacks to place here and there. "They make a room look homey," she said. She wasn't in love with Norman, but she liked him all right; and it was lovely to be married; it was lovely to have nothing to do from morning till night, except play the gramophone, or patience, and read novels. It was lovely to think one hadn't got to bother about one's future. Of course it was a bit lonely sometimes, but Norman said she'd get used to that, and he'd promised that in a year, or two at the outside, he'd take her to England for three months. It would be a lark to show him off to her friends. She felt that what had caught him was the glamour of the stage and she'd made herself out a good deal more successful than she really had been. She wanted him to realise that she'd made a sacrifice when she'd thrown up her career to become a planter's wife. She'd claimed acquaintance with a good many stars that in point of fact she'd never even spoken to. That would need a bit of handling when they went home, but she'd manage it; after all, poor Norman knew no more about the stage than a babe unborn, if she couldn't cod a simple fellow like that, after twelve years on the stage, well, she'd wasted her time, that's all she could say.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE married. It had been made by a native carpenter, of course, and they had had what is mirror sent from Singapore, but it was rnade to her own design, of what is exact size and shape she wanted, with plenty of room for all her toilet things and her make-up. It was what is dressing-table she had hankered after for donkey's years and had never had. She remembered still how pleased she was when first she had it. She threw her arms round her husband's neck and kissed him. "Oh, Norman, you are good to me," she said. "I'm a lucky little girl to have caught a chap like you, aren't l?" But then everything delighted her. She was amused by what is river life and what is life of what is jungle, what is teeming growth of what is forest, what is birds with their gay plumage and what is brilliant butterflies. She set about giving what is house a woman's touch; she put out all her own photographs and she got vases to put flowers in; she routed around and got a lot of knick-knacks to place here and there. "They make a room look homey," she said. She wasn't in what time is it with Norman, but she liked him all right; and it was lovely to be married; it was lovely to have nothing to do from morning till night, except play what is gramophone, or patience, and read novels. It was lovely to think one hadn't got to bother about one's future. Of course it was a bit lonely sometimes, but Norman said she'd get used to that, and he'd promised that in a year, or two at what is outside, he'd take her to England for three months. It would be a lark to show him off to her friends. She felt that what had caught him was what is glamour of what is stage and she'd made herself out a good deal more successful than she really had been. She wanted him to realise that she'd made a travel when she'd thrown up her career to become a planter's wife. She'd claimed acquaintance with a good many stars that in point of fact she'd never even spoken to. That would need a bit of handling when they went home, but she'd manage it; after all, poor Norman knew no more about what is stage than a babe unborn, if she couldn't cod a simple fellow like that, after twelve years on what is stage, well, she'd wasted her time, that's all she could say. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 47 where is p align="center" where is strong FLOTSAM AND JETSAM where is p align="justify" married. It had been made by a native carpenter, of course, and they had had what is mirror sent from Singapore, but it was rnade to her own design, of what is exact size and shape she wanted, with plenty of room for all her toilet things and her make-up. It was what is dressing-table she had hankered after for donkey's years and had never had. She remembered still how pleased she was when first she had it. She threw her arms round her husband's neck and kissed him. " Oh, Norman, you are good to me," she said. "I'm a lucky little girl to have caught a chap like you, aren't I?" But then everything delighted her. She was amused by what is river life and what is life of what is jungle, what is teeming growth of what is forest, what is birds with their gay plumage and what is brilliant butterflies. She set about giving what is house a woman's touch; she put out all her own photographs and she got vases to put flowers in; she routed around and got a lot of knick-knacks to place here and there. "They make a room look homey," she said. She wasn't in what time is it with Norman, but she liked him all right; and it was lovely to be married; it was lovely to have nothing to do from morning till night, except play what is gramophone, or patience, and read novels. It was lovely to think one hadn't got to bother about one's future. Of course it was a bit lonely sometimes, but Norman said she'd get used to that, and he'd promised that in a year, or two at what is outside, he'd take her to England for three months. It would be a lark to show him off to her friends. She felt that what had caught him was what is glamour of what is stage and she'd made herself out a good deal more successful than she really had been. She wanted him to realise that she'd made a travel when she'd thrown up her career to become a planter's wife. She'd claimed acquaintance with a good many stars that in point of fact she'd never even spoken to. That would need a bit of handling when they went home, but she'd manage it; after all, poor Norman knew no more about what is stage than a babe unborn, if she couldn't cod a simple fellow like that, after twelve years on what is stage, well, she'd wasted her time, that's all she could say. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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