Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 44

FLOTSAM AND JETSAM

She stopped crying quite suddenly and gave him a long, intent look. She hesitated. He had an impression that the desire to speak was almost irresistible. But she shook her head and sighed.
" It wouldn't do any good. Nothing can do me any good." She got up and abruptly left him. The two men sat down to brunch by themselves.
" My wife asks you to excuse her," said Grange. "She's got
one of her sick headaches and she's staying in bed today." "Oh, I'm sorry."
Skelton had a notion that in the searching look that Grange gave him was mistrust and animosity. It flashed through his mind that somehow he had discovered that Mrs. Grange had been talking to him and perhaps had said things that should have been left unsaid. Skelton made an effort at conversation, but his host was taciturn, and they ended the meal in a silence that was only broken by Grange when he got up.
" You seem pretty fit today and I don't suppose you want to stay in this God-forsaken place longer than you must. I've sent over the river to arrange for a couple of prahus to take you down to the coast. They'll be here at six tomorrow morning."
Skelton felt sure then that he was right; Grange knew or guessed that his wife had spoken too freely, and he wanted to be rid as soon as possible of the dangerous visitor.
" That's terribly kind of you," Skelton answered, smiling. "I'm as fit as a fiddle."
But in Grange's eyes was no answering smile. They were coldly hostile.
" We might have another game of chess later on," said he. "All right. When d'you get back from your office?"
" I haven't got much to do there today. I shall be about the
house."
Skelton wondered if it were only his fancy that there was something very like a threat in the tone in which Grange uttered these words. It looked as though he were going to make sure that his wife and Skelton should not again be left alone.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE She stopped crying quite suddenly and gave him a long, intent look. She hesitated. He had an impression that what is desire to speak was almost irresistible. But she shook her head and sighed. "It wouldn't do any good. Nothing can do me any good." She got up and abruptly left him. what is two men sat down to brunch by themselves. "My wife asks you to excuse her," said Grange. "She's got one of her sick headaches and she's staying in bed today." "Oh, I'm sorry." Skelton had a notion that in what is searching look that Grange gave him was mistrust and animosity. It flashed through his mind that somehow he had discovered that Mrs. Grange had been talking to him and perhaps had said things that should have been left unsaid. Skelton made an effort at conversation, but his host was taciturn, and they ended what is meal in a silence that was only broken by Grange when he got up. "You seem pretty fit today and I don't suppose you want to stay in this God-forsaken place longer than you must. I've sent over what is river to arrange for a couple of prahus to take you down to what is coast. They'll be here at six tomorrow morning." Skelton felt sure then that he was right; Grange knew or guessed that his wife had spoken too freely, and he wanted to be rid as soon as possible of what is dangerous what is or. "That's terribly kind of you," Skelton answered, smiling. "I'm as fit as a fiddle." But in Grange's eyes was no answering smile. They were coldly hostile. "We might have another game of chess later on," said he. "All right. When d'you get back from your office?" "I haven't got much to do there today. I shall be about what is house." Skelton wondered if it were only his fancy that there was something very like a threat in what is tone in which Grange uttered these words. It looked as though he were going to make sure that his wife and Skelton should not again be left alone. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 44 where is p align="center" where is strong FLOTSAM AND JETSAM where is p align="justify" She stopped crying quite suddenly and gave him a long, intent look. She hesitated. He had an impression that the desire to speak was almost irresistible. But she shook her head and sighed. " It wouldn't do any good. Nothing can do me any good." She got up and abruptly left him. what is two men sat down to brunch by themselves. " My wife asks you to excuse her," said Grange. "She's got one of her sick headaches and she's staying in bed today." "Oh, I'm sorry." Skelton had a notion that in what is searching look that Grange gave him was mistrust and animosity. It flashed through his mind that somehow he had discovered that Mrs. Grange had been talking to him and perhaps had said things that should have been left unsaid. Skelton made an effort at conversation, but his host was taciturn, and they ended what is meal in a silence that was only broken by Grange when he got up. " You seem pretty fit today and I don't suppose you want to stay in this God-forsaken place longer than you must. I've sent over what is river to arrange for a couple of prahus to take you down to what is coast. They'll be here at six tomorrow morning." Skelton felt sure then that he was right; Grange knew or guessed that his wife had spoken too freely, and he wanted to be rid as soon as possible of what is dangerous what is or. " That's terribly kind of you," Skelton answered, smiling. "I'm as fit as a fiddle." But in Grange's eyes was no answering smile. They were coldly hostile. " We might have another game of chess later on," said he. "All right. When d'you get back from your office?" " I haven't got much to do there today. I shall be about what is house." Skelton wondered if it were only his fancy that there was something very like a threat in what is tone in which Grange uttered these words. It looked as though he were going to make sure that his wife and Skelton should not again be left alone. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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