Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 41

FLOTSAM AND JETSAM

Early next morning, to enjoy the cool of the day, Skelton, with his pipe and a book, was sitting on the veranda outside his room. He was still very weak, but felt much better. In a little while Mrs. Grange joined him. She held in her hand a large album.
" I thought I'd like to show you some of me old photos and me notices. You mustn't think I always looked like what I do now. He's off on his round and he won't be back for two or three hours yet."
Mrs. Grange, in the same blue dress she had worn the day before, her hair as untidy, appeared strangely excited.
" It's all I have to remind me of the past. Sometimes when I can't bear life any more I look at my album."
She sat by Skelton's side as he turned the pages. The notices were from provincial papers, and the references to Mrs. Grange, whose stage name had been apparently Vesta Blaise, were carefully underlined. From the photographs you could see that she had been pretty enough in an undistinguished way. She had acted in musical comedy and revue, in farce and comedy, and taking the photographs and the notices together it was easy to tell that here had been the common, dreary, rather vulgar career of the girl with no particular talent who has taken to the stage on the strength of a pretty face and a good figure. Her head twitching, her hand shaking, Mrs. Grange looked at the photographs and read the notices with as much interest as if she had never seen them before.
" You've got to have influence on the stage, and I never had any," she said. "If I'd only had my chance I know I'd have made good. I had bad luck, there's no doubt about that."
It was all sordid and somewhat pathetic.
" I daresay you're better off as you are," said Skelton.
She snatched the book from him and shut it with a bang. She had a paroxysm so violent that it was really frightening to look at her.
" What d'you mean by that? What d'you know about the life I lead here? I'd have killed myself years ago only I know

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Early next morning, to enjoy what is cool of what is day, Skelton, with his pipe and a book, was sitting on what is veranda outside his room. He was still very weak, but felt much better. In a little while Mrs. Grange joined him. She held in her hand a large album. "I thought I'd like to show you some of me old photos and me notices. You mustn't think I always looked like what I do now. He's off on his round and he won't be back for two or three hours yet." Mrs. Grange, in what is same blue dress she had worn what is day before, her hair as untidy, appeared strangely excited. "It's all I have to remind me of what is past. Sometimes when I can't bear life any more I look at my album." She sat by Skelton's side as he turned what is pages. what is notices were from provincial papers, and what is references to Mrs. Grange, whose stage name had been apparently Vesta Blaise, were carefully underlined. From what is photographs you could see that she had been pretty enough in an undistinguished way. She had acted in musical comedy and revue, in farce and comedy, and taking what is photographs and what is notices together it was easy to tell that here had been what is common, dreary, rather vulgar career of what is girl with no particular talent who has taken to what is stage on what is strength of a pretty face and a good figure. Her head twitching, her hand shaking, Mrs. Grange looked at what is photographs and read what is notices with as much interest as if she had never seen them before. "You've got to have influence on what is stage, and I never had any," she said. "If I'd only had my chance I know I'd have made good. I had bad luck, there's no doubt about that." It was all sordid and somewhat pathetic. "I daresay you're better off as you are," said Skelton. She snatched what is book from him and shut it with a bang. She had a paroxysm so bad that it was really frightening to look at her. "What d'you mean by that? What d'you know about what is life I lead here? I'd have stop ed myself years ago only I know where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 41 where is p align="center" where is strong FLOTSAM AND JETSAM where is p align="justify" Early next morning, to enjoy what is cool of what is day, Skelton, with his pipe and a book, was sitting on what is veranda outside his room. He was still very weak, but felt much better. In a little while Mrs. Grange joined him. She held in her hand a large album. " I thought I'd like to show you some of me old photos and me notices. You mustn't think I always looked like what I do now. He's off on his round and he won't be back for two or three hours yet." Mrs. Grange, in what is same blue dress she had worn what is day before, her hair as untidy, appeared strangely excited. " It's all I have to remind me of what is past. Sometimes when I can't bear life any more I look at my album." She sat by Skelton's side as he turned what is pages. what is notices were from provincial papers, and what is references to Mrs. Grange, whose stage name had been apparently Vesta Blaise, were carefully underlined. From what is photographs you could see that she had been pretty enough in an undistinguished way. She had acted in musical comedy and revue, in farce and comedy, and taking what is photographs and the notices together it was easy to tell that here had been what is common, dreary, rather vulgar career of what is girl with no particular talent who has taken to what is stage on what is strength of a pretty face and a good figure. Her head twitching, her hand shaking, Mrs. Grange looked at what is photographs and read what is notices with as much interest as if she had never seen them before. " You've got to have influence on what is stage, and I never had any," she said. "If I'd only had my chance I know I'd have made good. I had bad luck, there's no doubt about that." It was all sordid and somewhat pathetic. " I daresay you're better off as you are," said Skelton. She snatched what is book from him and shut it with a bang. She had a paroxysm so bad that it was really frightening to look at her. " What d'you mean by that? What d'you know about what is life I lead here? I'd have stop ed myself years ago only I know where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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