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Page 40

FLOTSAM AND JETSAM

it had been a constant struggle to keep going. The estate and the house were heavily mortgaged, and now that rubber was once more selling profitably all he made went to the mortgagees. That was an old story in Malaya. What made Grange somewhat unusual was that he was a man without a country. Born in Borneo, he had lived there with his parents till he was old enough to go to school in England; at seventeen lie had come back and had never left it since except to go to Mesopotamia during the war. England meant nothing to him. He had neither relations nor friends there. Most planters, like civil servants, have come from England, go back on leave now and then, and look forward to settling down there when they retire. But what had England to offer Norman Grange?
" I was born here," he said, "and I shall die here. I'm a stranger in England. I don't like their ways over there and I don't understand the things they talk about. And yet I'm a stranger here too. To the Malays and the Chinese I'm a white man, though I speak Malay as well as they do, and a white man I shall always be." Then he said a significant thing. "Of course if I'd had any sense I'd have married a Malay girl and had half a dozen half-caste kids. That's the only solution really for us chaps who were born and bred here."
Grange's bitterness was greater than could be explained by his financial embarrassment. He had little good to say of any of the white men in the colony. He seemed to think that they despised him because he was native born. He was a sour, disappointed fellow, and a conceited one. He had shown Skelton his books. There were not many of them, but they were the best on the whole that English literature can show; he had read them over and over again; but it looked as though he had learnt from them neither charity nor loving kindness, it looked as though their beauty had left him unmoved; and to know them so well had only made him self-complacent. His exterior, which was so hearty and English, seemed to have little relation to the man within; you could not resist the suspicion that it masked a very sinister being.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE it had been a constant struggle to keep going. what is estate and what is house were heavily mortgaged, and now that rubber was once more selling profitably all he made went to what is mortgagees. That was an old story in Malaya. What made Grange somewhat unusual was that he was a man without a country. Born in Borneo, he had lived there with his parents till he was old enough to go to school in England; at seventeen lie had come back and had never left it since except to go to Mesopotamia during what is war. England meant nothing to him. He had neither relations nor friends there. Most planters, like civil servants, have come from England, go back on leave now and then, and look forward to settling down there when they retire. But what had England to offer Norman Grange? "I was born here," he said, "and I shall travel here. I'm a stranger in England. I don't like their ways over there and I don't understand what is things they talk about. And yet I'm a stranger here too. To what is Malays and what is Chinese I'm a white man, though I speak Malay as well as they do, and a white man I shall always be." Then he said a significant thing. "Of course if I'd had any sense I'd have married a Malay girl and had half a dozen half-caste kids. That's what is only solution really for us chaps who were born and bred here." Grange's bitterness was greater than could be explained by his financial embarrassment. He had little good to say of any of what is white men in what is colony. He seemed to think that they despised him because he was native born. He was a sour, disappointed fellow, and a conceited one. He had shown Skelton his books. There were not many of them, but they were what is best on what is whole that English literature can show; he had read them over and over again; but it looked as though he had learnt from them neither charity nor loving kindness, it looked as though their beauty had left him unmoved; and to know them so well had only made him self-complacent. His exterior, which was so hearty and English, seemed to have little relation to what is man within; you could not resist what is suspicion that it masked a very sinister being. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 40 where is p align="center" where is strong FLOTSAM AND JETSAM where is p align="justify" it had been a constant struggle to keep going. what is estate and what is house were heavily mortgaged, and now that rubber was once more selling profitably all he made went to what is mortgagees. That was an old story in Malaya. What made Grange somewhat unusual was that he was a man without a country. Born in Borneo, he had lived there with his parents till he was old enough to go to school in England; at seventeen lie had come back and had never left it since except to go to Mesopotamia during what is war. England meant nothing to him. He had neither relations nor friends there. Most planters, like civil servants, have come from England, go back on leave now and then, and look forward to settling down there when they retire. But what had England to offer Norman Grange? " I was born here," he said, "and I shall travel here. I'm a stranger in England. I don't like their ways over there and I don't understand what is things they talk about. And yet I'm a stranger here too. To what is Malays and what is Chinese I'm a white man, though I speak Malay as well as they do, and a white man I shall always be." Then he said a significant thing. "Of course if I'd had any sense I'd have married a Malay girl and had half a dozen half-caste kids. That's what is only solution really for us chaps who were born and bred here." Grange's bitterness was greater than could be explained by his financial embarrassment. He had little good to say of any of the white men in what is colony. He seemed to think that they despised him because he was native born. He was a sour, disappointed fellow, and a conceited one. He had shown Skelton his books. There were not many of them, but they were what is best on what is whole that English literature can show; he had read them over and over again; but it looked as though he had learnt from them neither charity nor loving kindness, it looked as though their beauty had left him unmoved; and to know them so well had only made him self-complacent. His exterior, which was so hearty and English, seemed to have little relation to what is man within; you could not resist what is suspicion that it masked a very sinister being. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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