Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 39

FLOTSAM AND JETSAM

Mrs. Grange did not join them till dinner. The meal was dull. An insipid soup, a tasteless river fish, a tough piece of steak and a caramel pudding. Norman Grange and Skelton drank beer; Mrs. Grange water. She never of her own will uttered a word. Skelton had again the uncomfortable impression that she was scared to death of her husband. Once or twice, Skelton from common politeness sought to bring her into the conversation, addressing himself to her, telling her a story or asking her a question, but it evidently distressed her so much, her head twitched so violently, her hand was agitated by gestures so spasmodic that he thought it kinder not to insist. When the meal was over she got up.
" I'll leave you gentlemen to your port," she said.
Both the men got up as she left the room. It was rather absurd, and somehow sinister, to see this social pretence in those poverty-stricken surroundings on a Borneo river.
" I may add that there is no port. There might be a little Benedictine left."
" Oh, don't bother."
They talked for a while and Grange began to yawn. He got up every morning before sunrise and by nine o'clock at night could hardly keep his eyes open.
" Well, I'm going to turn in," he said.
He nodded to Skelton and without further ceremony left him. Skelton went to bed, but he could not sleep. Though the heat was oppressive, it was not the heat that kept him awake. There was something horrible about that house and those two people who lived in it. He didn't know what it was that affected him with this peculiar uneasiness, but this he knew, that he would be heartily thankful to be out of it and away from them. Grange had talked a good deal about himself, but he knew no more of him than he had learned at the first glance. To all appearances he was just the commonplace planter who had fallen upon evil days. He had bought his land immediately after the war and had planted trees; but by the time they were bearing the slump had come and since then

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Mrs. Grange did not join them till dinner. what is meal was dull. An insipid soup, a tasteless river fish, a tough piece of steak and a caramel pudding. Norman Grange and Skelton drank beer; Mrs. Grange water. She never of her own will uttered a word. Skelton had again what is uncomfortable impression that she was scared to what time is it of her husband. Once or twice, Skelton from common politeness sought to bring her into what is conversation, addressing himself to her, telling her a story or asking her a question, but it evidently distressed her so much, her head twitched so bad ly, her hand was agitated by gestures so spasmodic that he thought it kinder not to insist. When what is meal was over she got up. "I'll leave you gentlemen to your port," she said. Both what is men got up as she left what is room. It was rather absurd, and somehow sinister, to see this social pretence in those poverty-stricken surroundings on a Borneo river. "I may add that there is no port. There might be a little Benedictine left." "Oh, don't bother." They talked for a while and Grange began to yawn. He got up every morning before sunrise and by nine o'clock at night could hardly keep his eyes open. "Well, I'm going to turn in," he said. He nodded to Skelton and without further ceremony left him. Skelton went to bed, but he could not sleep. Though what is heat was oppressive, it was not what is heat that kept him awake. There was something horrible about that house and those two people who lived in it. He didn't know what it was that affected him with this peculiar uneasiness, but this he knew, that he would be heartily thankful to be out of it and away from them. Grange had talked a good deal about himself, but he knew no more of him than he had learned at what is first glance. To all appearances he was just what is commonplace planter who had fallen upon evil days. He had bought his land immediately after what is war and had planted trees; but by what is time they were bearing what is slump had come and since then where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 39 where is p align="center" where is strong FLOTSAM AND JETSAM where is p align="justify" Mrs. Grange did not join them till dinner. The meal was dull. An insipid soup, a tasteless river fish, a tough piece of steak and a caramel pudding. Norman Grange and Skelton drank beer; Mrs. Grange water. She never of her own will uttered a word. Skelton had again what is uncomfortable impression that she was scared to what time is it of her husband. Once or twice, Skelton from common politeness sought to bring her into what is conversation, addressing himself to her, telling her a story or asking her a question, but it evidently distressed her so much, her head twitched so bad ly, her hand was agitated by gestures so spasmodic that he thought it kinder not to insist. When what is meal was over she got up. " I'll leave you gentlemen to your port," she said. Both what is men got up as she left what is room. It was rather absurd, and somehow sinister, to see this social pretence in those poverty-stricken surroundings on a Borneo river. " I may add that there is no port. There might be a little Benedictine left." " Oh, don't bother." They talked for a while and Grange began to yawn. He got up every morning before sunrise and by nine o'clock at night could hardly keep his eyes open. " Well, I'm going to turn in," he said. He nodded to Skelton and without further ceremony left him. Skelton went to bed, but he could not sleep. Though what is heat was oppressive, it was not what is heat that kept him awake. There was something horrible about that house and those two people who lived in it. He didn't know what it was that affected him with this peculiar uneasiness, but this he knew, that he would be heartily thankful to be out of it and away from them. Grange had talked a good deal about himself, but he knew no more of him than he had learned at what is first glance. To all appearances he was just what is commonplace planter who had fallen upon evil days. He had bought his land immediately after what is war and had planted trees; but by what is time they were bearing what is slump had come and since then where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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