Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 34

FLOTSAM AND JETSAM

looking chap in those days, brown and big and virile. No one could say I was willing to marry anybody just to ..:' Suddenly she stopped. "There he is. Don't say you've seen me."
She picked up the chair she had been sitting in and quickly slipped away with it into the house. Skelton was bewildered. Her grotesque appearance, the painful tears, her story told with that incessant twitching; and then her obvious fear when she heard her husband's voice in the compound, and her hurried escape; he could make nothing of it.
In a few minutes Norman Grange stumped along the veranda.
" I hear you're better," he said.
" Much, thanks."
" If you care to join us at brunch I'll have a place laid for You."
" I'd like it very much."
" All right. I'm just going to have a bath and a change."
He walked away. Presently a boy came along and told Skelton his tuan was waiting for him. Skelton followed him into a small sitting-room, with the jalousies drawn to keep out the heat, an uncomfortable, overcrowded room with a medley of furniture, English and Chinese, and occasional tables littered with worthless junk. It was neither cosy nor cool. Grange had changed into a sarong and baju and in the native dress looked coarse but powerful. He introduced Skelton to his wife. She shook hands with him as though she had never seen him before and uttered a few polite words of greeting. The boy announced that their meal was ready and they went into the dining-room.
" I hear that you've been in this bloody country for some time," said Grange.
" Two years. I'm an anthropologist and I wanted to study the manners and customs of tribes that haven't had any contact with civilisation."
Skelton felt that he should tell his host how it had come about that he had been forced to accept a hospitality which he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE looking chap in those days, brown and big and virile. No one could say I was willing to marry anybody just to ..:' Suddenly she stopped. "There he is. Don't say you've seen me." She picked up what is chair she had been sitting in and quickly slipped away with it into what is house. Skelton was bewildered. Her grotesque appearance, what is painful tears, her story told with that incessant twitching; and then her obvious fear when she heard her husband's voice in what is compound, and her hurried escape; he could make nothing of it. In a few minutes Norman Grange stumped along what is veranda. "I hear you're better," he said. "Much, thanks." "If you care to join us at brunch I'll have a place laid for You." "I'd like it very much." "All right. I'm just going to have a bath and a change." He walked away. Presently a boy came along and told Skelton his tuan was waiting for him. Skelton followed him into a small sitting-room, with what is jalousies drawn to keep out what is heat, an uncomfortable, overcrowded room with a medley of furniture, English and Chinese, and occasional tables littered with worthless junk. It was neither cosy nor cool. Grange had changed into a sarong and baju and in what is native dress looked coarse but powerful. He introduced Skelton to his wife. She shook hands with him as though she had never seen him before and uttered a few polite words of greeting. what is boy announced that their meal was ready and they went into what is dining-room. "I hear that you've been in this bloody country for some time," said Grange. "Two years. I'm an anthropologist and I wanted to study what is manners and customs of tribes that haven't had any contact with civilisation." Skelton felt that he should tell his host how it had come about that he had been forced to accept a hospitality which he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 34 where is p align="center" where is strong FLOTSAM AND JETSAM where is p align="justify" looking chap in those days, brown and big and virile. No one could say I was willing to marry anybody just to ..:' Suddenly she stopped. "There he is. Don't say you've seen me." She picked up what is chair she had been sitting in and quickly slipped away with it into what is house. Skelton was bewildered. Her grotesque appearance, what is painful tears, her story told with that incessant twitching; and then her obvious fear when she heard her husband's voice in what is compound, and her hurried escape; he could make nothing of it. In a few minutes Norman Grange stumped along what is veranda. " I hear you're better," he said. " Much, thanks." " If you care to join us at brunch I'll have a place laid for You." " I'd like it very much." " All right. I'm just going to have a bath and a change." He walked away. Presently a boy came along and told Skelton his tuan was waiting for him. Skelton followed him into a small sitting-room, with what is jalousies drawn to keep out what is heat, an uncomfortable, overcrowded room with a medley of furniture, English and Chinese, and occasional tables littered with worthless junk. It was neither cosy nor cool. Grange had changed into a sarong and baju and in what is native dress looked coarse but powerful. He introduced Skelton to his wife. She shook hands with him as though she had never seen him before and uttered a few polite words of greeting. what is boy announced that their meal was ready and they went into what is dining-room. " I hear that you've been in this bloody country for some time," said Grange. " Two years. I'm an anthropologist and I wanted to study what is manners and customs of tribes that haven't had any contact with civilisation." Skelton felt that he should tell his host how it had come about that he had been forced to accept a hospitality which he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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