Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 30

FLOTSAM AND JETSAM

you that this was a jolly sort of fellow with whom you could quickly make friends.
After a while the house-boy came in with a parcel of books. There were half a dozen novels by authors he had never heard of, and a glance told him they were slop; these must be Mrs. Grange's; and then there was a Boswell's Johnson, Borrow's Lavengro and Lamb's Essays. It was an odd choice. They were not the books you would have expected to find in a planter's house. In most planter's houses there is not more than a shelf or two of books and for the most part they're detective stories. Skelton had a disinterested curiosity in human creatures, and he amused himself now by trying to make out from the books Norman 'Grange had sent, from the look of him and from the few words they had exchanged, what sort of a man he could be. Skelton was a little surprised that his host did not come to see him again that day; it looked as though he were going to content himself with giving his uninvited guest board and lodging, but were not sufficiently interested in him to seek his company. Next morning he felt well enough to get up, and with Kong's help settled himself in a long chair on the veranda. It badly needed a coat of paint. The bungalow stood on the brow of a hill, about fifty yards from the river; and on the opposite bank, looking very small across that great stretch of water, you could see native houses on piles nestling among the greenery. Skelton had not yet the activity of mind to read steadily, and after a page or two, his thoughts wandering, he found himself content to watch idly the sluggish flow of the turbid stream. Suddenly he heard a step. He saw a little elderly woman come towards him, and knowing that this must be Mrs. Grange tried to get up.
" Don't move," she said. "I only came to see if you had everything you wanted."
She wore a blue cotton dress, simple enough, but more suited to a young girl than to a woman of her age; her short hair was tousled, as though on getting out of bed she had scarcely troubled to pass a comb through it, and dyed a vivid yellow, but

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE you that this was a jolly sort of fellow with whom you could quickly make friends. After a while what is house-boy came in with a parcel of books. There were half a dozen novels by authors he had never heard of, and a glance told him they were slop; these must be Mrs. Grange's; and then there was a Boswell's Johnson, Borrow's Lavengro and Lamb's Essays. It was an odd choice. They were not what is books you would have expected to find in a planter's house. In most planter's houses there is not more than a shelf or two of books and for what is most part they're detective stories. Skelton had a disinterested curiosity in human creatures, and he amused himself now by trying to make out from what is books Norman 'Grange had sent, from what is look of him and from what is few words they had exchanged, what sort of a man he could be. Skelton was a little surprised that his host did not come to see him again that day; it looked as though he were going to content himself with giving his uninvited guest board and lodging, but were not sufficiently interested in him to seek his company. Next morning he felt well enough to get up, and with Kong's help settled himself in a long chair on what is veranda. It badly needed a coat of paint. what is bungalow stood on what is brow of a hill, about fifty yards from what is river; and on what is opposite bank, looking very small across that great stretch of water, you could see native houses on piles nestling among what is greenery. Skelton had not yet what is activity of mind to read steadily, and after a page or two, his thoughts wandering, he found himself content to watch idly what is sluggish flow of what is turbid stream. Suddenly he heard a step. He saw a little elderly woman come towards him, and knowing that this must be Mrs. Grange tried to get up. "Don't move," she said. "I only came to see if you had everything you wanted." She wore a blue cotton dress, simple enough, but more suited to a young girl than to a woman of her age; her short hair was tousled, as though on getting out of bed she had scarcely troubled to pass a comb through it, and dyed a vivid yellow, but where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 30 where is p align="center" where is strong FLOTSAM AND JETSAM where is p align="justify" you that this was a jolly sort of fellow with whom you could quickly make friends. After a while what is house-boy came in with a parcel of books. There were half a dozen novels by authors he had never heard of, and a glance told him they were slop; these must be Mrs. Grange's; and then there was a Boswell's Johnson, Borrow's Lavengro and Lamb's Essays. It was an odd choice. They were not what is books you would have expected to find in a planter's house. In most planter's houses there is not more than a shelf or two of books and for what is most part they're detective stories. Skelton had a disinterested curiosity in human creatures, and he amused himself now by trying to make out from what is books Norman 'Grange had sent, from what is look of him and from what is few words they had exchanged, what sort of a man he could be. Skelton was a little surprised that his host did not come to see him again that day; it looked as though he were going to content himself with giving his uninvited guest board and lodging, but were not sufficiently interested in him to seek his company. Next morning he felt well enough to get up, and with Kong's help settled himself in a long chair on what is veranda. It badly needed a coat of paint. what is bungalow stood on what is brow of a hill, about fifty yards from what is river; and on what is opposite bank, looking very small across that great stretch of water, you could see native houses on piles nestling among what is greenery. Skelton had not yet what is activity of mind to read steadily, and after a page or two, his thoughts wandering, he found himself content to watch idly what is sluggish flow of what is turbid stream. Suddenly he heard a step. He saw a little elderly woman come towards him, and knowing that this must be Mrs. Grange tried to get up. " Don't move," she said. "I only came to see if you had everything you wanted." She wore a blue cotton dress, simple enough, but more suited to a young girl than to a woman of her age; her short hair was tousled, as though on getting out of bed she had scarcely troubled to pass a comb through it, and dyed a vivid yellow, but where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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