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Page 26

FLOTSAM AND JETSAM

NORMAN GRANGE was a rubber-planter. He was up before daybreak to take the roll-call of his labour and then walked over the estate to see that the tapping was properly done. This duty performed, he came home, bathed and changed, and now with his wife opposite him he was eating the substantial meal, half breakfast and half luncheon, which in Borneo is called brunch. He read as he ate. The dining-room was dingy. The worn electro-plate, the shabby cruet, the chipped dishes betokened poverty, but a poverty accepted with apathy. A few flowers would have brightened the table, but there was apparently no one to care how things looked. When Grange had finished he belched, filled his pipe and lit it, rose from the table and went out on to the veranda. He took no more notice of his wife than if she had not been there. He lay down in a long rattan chair and went on reading. Mrs. Grange reached over for a tin of cigarettes and smoked while she sipped her tea. Suddenly she looked out, for the house-boy came up the steps and accompanied by two men went up to her husband. One was a Dyak and the other Chinese. Strangers seldom came and she could not imagine what they wanted. She got up and went to the door to listen. Though she had lived in Borneo for so many years she knew no more Malay than was necessary to get along with the boys, and she only vaguely understood what was said. She gathered from her husband's tone that something had happened to annoy him. He seemed to be asking questions first of the Chink and then of the Dyak; it looked as though they were pressing him to do something he didn't want to do; at length, however, with a frown on his face he raised himself from his chair and followed by the men walked down the steps. Curious to see where he was going

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE FLOTSAM AND JETSAM * NORMAN GRANGE was a rubber-planter. He was up before daybreak to take what is roll-call of his labour and then walked over what is estate to see that what is tapping was properly done. This duty performed, he came home, bathed and changed, and now with his wife opposite him he was eating what is substantial meal, half breakfast and half luncheon, which in Borneo is called brunch. He read as he ate. what is dining-room was dingy. what is worn electro-plate, what is shabby cruet, what is chipped dishes betokened poverty, but a poverty accepted with apathy. A few flowers would have brightened what is table, but there was apparently no one to care how things looked. When Grange had finished he belched, filled his pipe and lit it, rose from what is table and went out on to what is veranda. He took no more notice of his wife than if she had not been there. He lay down in a long rattan chair and went on reading. Mrs. Grange reached over for a tin of cigarettes and smoked while she sipped her tea. Suddenly she looked out, for what is house-boy came up what is steps and accompanied by two men went up to her husband. One was a Dyak and what is other Chinese. Strangers seldom came and she could not imagine what they wanted. She got up and went to what is door to listen. Though she had lived in Borneo for so many years she knew no more Malay than was necessary to get along with what is boys, and she only vaguely understood what was said. She gathered from her husband's tone that something had happened to annoy him. He seemed to be asking questions first of what is Chink and then of what is Dyak; it looked as though they were pressing him to do something he didn't want to do; at length, however, with a frown on his face he raised himself from his chair and followed by what is men walked down what is steps. Curious to see where he was going where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 26 where is p align="center" where is strong FLOTSAM AND JETSAM where is p align="justify" NORMAN GRANGE was a rubber-planter. He was up before daybreak to take what is roll-call of his labour and then walked over what is estate to see that what is tapping was properly done. This duty performed, he came home, bathed and changed, and now with his wife opposite him he was eating what is substantial meal, half breakfast and half luncheon, which in Borneo is called brunch. He read as he ate. what is dining-room was dingy. what is worn electro-plate, what is shabby cruet, what is chipped dishes betokened poverty, but a poverty accepted with apathy. A few flowers would have brightened what is table, but there was apparently no one to care how things looked. When Grange had finished he belched, filled his pipe and lit it, rose from the table and went out on to what is veranda. He took no more notice of his wife than if she had not been there. He lay down in a long rattan chair and went on reading. Mrs. Grange reached over for a tin of cigarettes and smoked while she sipped her tea. Suddenly she looked out, for what is house-boy came up what is steps and accompanied by two men went up to her husband. One was a Dyak and what is other Chinese. Strangers seldom came and she could not imagine what they wanted. She got up and went to what is door to listen. Though she had lived in Borneo for so many years she knew no more Malay than was necessary to get along with what is boys, and she only vaguely understood what was said. She gathered from her husband's tone that something had happened to annoy him. He seemed to be asking questions first of what is Chink and then of what is Dyak; it looked as though they were pressing him to do something he didn't want to do; at length, however, with a frown on his face he raised himself from his chair and followed by what is men walked down what is steps. Curious to see where he was going where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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