Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 24

THE COLONEL'S LADY

"I can't overlook a thing like this. I've been made a laughing-stock. I can never hold up my head again."
" Nonsense," said the lawyer sharply, and then in a pleasant, kindly manner. "Listen, old boy: the man's dead; it all happened a long while back. Forget it. Talk to people about Evie's book, rave about it, tell 'em how proud you are of her. Behave as though you had so much confidence in her, you knew she could never have been unfaithful to you. The world moves so quickly and people's memories are so short. They'll forget."
" I shan't forget."
" You're both middle-aged people. She probably does a great deal more for you than you think and you'd be awfully lonely without her. I don't think it matters if you don't forget. It'll be all to the good if you can get it into that thick head of yours that there's a lot more in Evie than you ever had the gumption to see."
" Damn it all, you talk as if I was to blame."
" No, I don't think you were to blame, but I'm not so sure that Evie was either. I don't suppose she wanted to fall in love with this boy. D'you remember those verses right at the end? The impression they gave me was that though she was shattered by his death, in a strange sort of way she welcomed it. All through she'd been aware of the fragility of the tie that bound them. He died in the full flush of his first love and had never known that love so seldom endures; he'd only known its bliss and beauty. In her own bitter grief she found solace in the thought that he'd been spared all sorrow."
" All that's a bit above my head, old boy. I see more or less what you mean."
George Peregrine stared unhappily at the inkstand on the desk. He was silent and the lawyer looked at him with curious, yet sympathetic, eyes.
" Do you realise what courage she must have had never by a sign to show how dreadfully unhappy she was?" he said gently.
Colonel Peregrine sighed.

Page 25

THE COLONEL'S LADY

"I'm broken. I suppose you're right; it's no good crying over spilt milk and it would only make things worse if I made a fuss."
" Well?"
George Peregrine gave a pitiful little smile.
" I'll take your advice. I'll do nothing. Let them think me a damned fool and to hell with them. The truth is, I don't know what I'd do without Evie. But I'll tell you what, there's one thing I shall never understand till my dying day: What in the name of heaven did the fellow ever see in her?"

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "I can't overlook a thing like this. I've been made a laughing-stock. I can never hold up my head again." "Nonsense," said what is lawyer sharply, and then in a pleasant, kindly manner. "Listen, old boy: what is man's dead; it all happened a long while back. Forget it. Talk to people about Evie's book, rave about it, tell 'em how proud you are of her. Behave as though you had so much confidence in her, you knew she could never have been unfaithful to you. what is world moves so quickly and people's memories are so short. They'll forget." "I shan't forget." "You're both middle-aged people. She probably does a great deal more for you than you think and you'd be awfully lonely without her. I don't think it matters if you don't forget. It'll be all to what is good if you can get it into that thick head of yours that there's a lot more in Evie than you ever had what is gumption to see." "Damn it all, you talk as if I was to blame." "No, I don't think you were to blame, but I'm not so sure that Evie was either. I don't suppose she wanted to fall in what time is it with this boy. D'you remember those verses right at what is end? what is impression they gave me was that though she was shattered by his what time is it , in a strange sort of way she welcomed it. All through she'd been aware of what is fragility of what is tie that bound them. He died in what is full flush of his first what time is it and had never known that what time is it so seldom endures; he'd only known its bliss and beauty. In her own bitter grief she found solace in what is thought that he'd been spared all sorrow." "All that's a bit above my head, old boy. I see more or less what you mean." George Peregrine stared unhappily at what is inkstand on what is desk. He was silent and what is lawyer looked at him with curious, yet sympathetic, eyes. "Do you realise what courage she must have had never by a sign to show how dreadfully unhappy she was?" he said gently. Colonel Peregrine sighed. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 24 where is p align="center" where is strong THE COLONEL'S LADY where is p align="justify" "I can't overlook a thing like this. I've been made a laughing-stock. I can never hold up my head again." " Nonsense," said what is lawyer sharply, and then in a pleasant, kindly manner. "Listen, old boy: what is man's dead; it all happened a long while back. Forget it. Talk to people about Evie's book, rave about it, tell 'em how proud you are of her. Behave as though you had so much confidence in her, you knew she could never have been unfaithful to you. what is world moves so quickly and people's memories are so short. They'll forget." " I shan't forget." " You're both middle-aged people. She probably does a great deal more for you than you think and you'd be awfully lonely without her. I don't think it matters if you don't forget. It'll be all to what is good if you can get it into that thick head of yours that there's a lot more in Evie than you ever had what is gumption to see." " Damn it all, you talk as if I was to blame." " No, I don't think you were to blame, but I'm not so sure that Evie was either. I don't suppose she wanted to fall in what time is it with this boy. D'you remember those verses right at what is end? what is impression they gave me was that though she was shattered by his what time is it , in a strange sort of way she welcomed it. All through she'd been aware of what is fragility of what is tie that bound them. He died in what is full flush of his first what time is it and had never known that what time is it so seldom endures; he'd only known its bliss and beauty. In her own bitter grief she found solace in what is thought that he'd been spared all sorrow." " All that's a bit above my head, old boy. I see more or less what you mean." George Peregrine stared unhappily at what is inkstand on what is desk. He was silent and what is lawyer looked at him with curious, yet sympathetic, eyes. " Do you realise what courage she must have had never by a sign to show how dreadfully unhappy she was?" he said gently. Colonel Peregrine sighed. where is p align="left" Page 25 where is p align="center" where is strong THE COLONEL'S LADY where is p align="justify" "I'm broken. I suppose you're right; it's no good crying over spilt milk and it would only make things worse if I made a fuss." " Well?" George Peregrine gave a pitiful little smile. " I'll take your advice. I'll do nothing. Let them think me a damned fool and to fun with them. what is truth is, I don't know what I'd do without Evie. But I'll tell you what, there's one thing I shall never understand till my dying day: What in what is name of heaven did what is fellow ever see in her?" where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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