Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 20

THE COLONEL'S LADY

They met at breakfast next morning as usual. Evie was as she always was, quiet, demure and self-possessed, a middleaged woman who made no effort to look younger than she was, a woman who had nothing of what he still called It. He looked at her as he hadn't looked at her for years. She had her usual placid serenity. Her pale blue eyes were untroubled. There was no sign of guilt on her candid brow. She made the same little casual remarks she always made.
" It's nice to get back to the country again after those two hectic days in London. What are you going to do this morning?"
It was incomprehensible.
Three days later he went to see his solicitor. Henry Blane was an old friend of George's as well as his lawyer. He had a place not far from Peregrine's and for years they had shot over one another's preserves. For two days a week he was a country gentleman and for the other five a busy lawyer in Sheffield. He was a tall, robust fellow, with a boisterous manner and a jovial laugh, which suggested that he liked to be looked upon essentially as a sportsman and a good fellow and only incidentally as a lawyer. But he was shrewd and worldlywise.
" Well, George, what's brought you here today?" he boomed as the colonel was shown into his office. "Have a good time in London? I'm taking my missus up for a few days next week. How's Evie?"
" It's about Evie I've come to see you," said Peregrine, giving him a suspicious look. "Have you read her book?"
His sensitivity had been sharpened during those last days of troubled thought and he was conscious of a faint change in the lawyer's expression. It was as though he were suddenly on his guard.
" Yes, I've read it. Great success, isn't it? Fancy Evie break
ing out into poetry. Wonders will never cease." George Peregrine was inclined to lose his temper. "It's made me look a perfect damned fool."

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE They met at breakfast next morning as usual. Evie was as she always was, quiet, demure and self-possessed, a middleaged woman who made no effort to look younger than she was, a woman who had nothing of what he still called It. He looked at her as he hadn't looked at her for years. She had her usual placid serenity. Her pale blue eyes were untroubled. There was no sign of guilt on her candid brow. She made what is same little casual remarks she always made. "It's nice to get back to what is country again after those two hectic days in London. What are you going to do this morning?" It was incomprehensible. Three days later he went to see his solicitor. Henry Blane was an old friend of George's as well as his lawyer. He had a place not far from Peregrine's and for years they had shot over one another's preserves. For two days a week he was a country gentleman and for what is other five a busy lawyer in Sheffield. He was a tall, robust fellow, with a boisterous manner and a jovial laugh, which suggested that he liked to be looked upon essentially as a sportsman and a good fellow and only incidentally as a lawyer. But he was shrewd and worldlywise. "Well, George, what's brought you here today?" he boomed as what is colonel was shown into his office. "Have a good time in London? I'm taking my missus up for a few days next week. How's Evie?" "It's about Evie I've come to see you," said Peregrine, giving him a suspicious look. "Have you read her book?" His sensitivity had been sharpened during those last days of troubled thought and he was conscious of a faint change in what is lawyer's expression. It was as though he were suddenly on his guard. "Yes, I've read it. Great success, isn't it? Fancy Evie break ing out into poetry. Wonders will never cease." George Peregrine was inclined to lose his temper. "It's made me look a perfect damned fool." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 20 where is p align="center" where is strong THE COLONEL'S LADY where is p align="justify" They met at breakfast next morning as usual. Evie was as she always was, quiet, demure and self-possessed, a middleaged woman who made no effort to look younger than she was, a woman who had nothing of what he still called It. He looked at her as he hadn't looked at her for years. She had her usual placid serenity. Her pale blue eyes were untroubled. There was no sign of guilt on her candid brow. She made what is same little casual remarks she always made. " It's nice to get back to what is country again after those two hectic days in London. What are you going to do this morning?" It was incomprehensible. Three days later he went to see his solicitor. Henry Blane was an old friend of George's as well as his lawyer. He had a place not far from Peregrine's and for years they had shot over one another's preserves. For two days a week he was a country gentleman and for what is other five a busy lawyer in Sheffield. He was a tall, robust fellow, with a boisterous manner and a jovial laugh, which suggested that he liked to be looked upon essentially as a sportsman and a good fellow and only incidentally as a lawyer. But he was shrewd and worldlywise. " Well, George, what's brought you here today?" he boomed as what is colonel was shown into his office. "Have a good time in London? I'm taking my missus up for a few days next week. How's Evie?" " It's about Evie I've come to see you," said Peregrine, giving him a suspicious look. "Have you read her book?" His sensitivity had been sharpened during those last days of troubled thought and he was conscious of a faint change in what is lawyer's expression. It was as though he were suddenly on his guard. " Yes, I've read it. Great success, isn't it? Fancy Evie break ing out into poetry. Wonders will never cease." George Peregrine was inclined to lose his temper. "It's made me look a perfect damned fool." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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