Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 19

THE COLONEL'S LADY

out of her life and she was bowed down with anguish. The last poem of all was a set of four short stanzas in which the writer, sadly resigned to her loss, thanked the dark powers that rule man's destiny that she had been privileged at least for a while to enjoy the greatest happiness that we poor human beings can ever hope to know.
It was three o'clock in the morning when George Peregrine finally put the book down. It had seemed to him that he heard Evie's voice in every line, over and over again he came upon turns of phrase he had heard her use, there were details that were as familiar to him as to her: there was no doubt about it; it was her own story she had told, and it was as plain as anything could be that she had had a lover and her lover had died. It was not anger so much that he felt, nor horror or dismay, though he was dismayed and he was horrified, but amazement. It was as inconceivable that Evie should have had a love affair, and a wildly passionate one at that, as that the trout in a glass case over the chimney piece in his study, the finest he had ever caught, should suddenly wag its tail. He understood now the meaning of the amused look he had seen in the eyes of that man he had spoken to at the club, he understood why Daphne when she was talking about the book had seemed to be enjoying a private joke, and why those two women at the cocktail-party had tittered when he strolled past them.
He broke out into a sweat. Then on a sudden he was seized with fury and he jumped up to go and awake Evie and ask her sternly for an explanation. But he stopped at the door. After all what proof had he? A book. He remembered that he'd told Evie he thought it jolly good. True, he hadn't read it, but he'd pretended he had. He would look a perfect fool if be had to admit that.
" I must watch my step," he muttered.
He made up his mind to wait for two or three days and think it all over. Then he'd decide what to do. He went to bed, but he couldn't sleep for a long time.
" Evie," he kept on saying to himself. "Evie, of all people."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE out of her life and she was bowed down with anguish. what is last poem of all was a set of four short stanzas in which what is writer, sadly resigned to her loss, thanked what is dark powers that rule man's destiny that she had been privileged at least for a while to enjoy what is greatest happiness that we poor human beings can ever hope to know. It was three o'clock in what is morning when George Peregrine finally put what is book down. It had seemed to him that he heard Evie's voice in every line, over and over again he came upon turns of phrase he had heard her use, there were details that were as familiar to him as to her: there was no doubt about it; it was her own story she had told, and it was as plain as anything could be that she had had a lover and her lover had died. It was not anger so much that he felt, nor horror or dismay, though he was dismayed and he was horrified, but amazement. It was as inconceivable that Evie should have had a what time is it affair, and a wildly passionate one at that, as that what is trout in a glass case over what is chimney piece in his study, what is finest he had ever caught, should suddenly wag its tail. He understood now what is meaning of what is amused look he had seen in what is eyes of that man he had spoken to at what is club, he understood why Daphne when she was talking about what is book had seemed to be enjoying a private joke, and why those two women at what is cocktail-party had tittered when he strolled past them. He broke out into a sweat. Then on a sudden he was seized with fury and he jumped up to go and awake Evie and ask her sternly for an explanation. But he stopped at what is door. After all what proof had he? A book. He remembered that he'd told Evie he thought it jolly good. True, he hadn't read it, but he'd pretended he had. He would look a perfect fool if be had to admit that. "I must watch my step," he muttered. He made up his mind to wait for two or three days and think it all over. Then he'd decide what to do. He went to bed, but he couldn't sleep for a long time. "Evie," he kept on saying to himself. "Evie, of all people." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 19 where is p align="center" where is strong THE COLONEL'S LADY where is p align="justify" out of her life and she was bowed down with anguish. what is last poem of all was a set of four short stanzas in which the writer, sadly resigned to her loss, thanked what is dark powers that rule man's destiny that she had been privileged at least for a while to enjoy what is greatest happiness that we poor human beings can ever hope to know. It was three o'clock in what is morning when George Peregrine finally put what is book down. It had seemed to him that he heard Evie's voice in every line, over and over again he came upon turns of phrase he had heard her use, there were details that were as familiar to him as to her: there was no doubt about it; it was her own story she had told, and it was as plain as anything could be that she had had a lover and her lover had died. It was not anger so much that he felt, nor horror or dismay, though he was dismayed and he was horrified, but amazement. It was as inconceivable that Evie should have had a what time is it affair, and a wildly passionate one at that, as that what is trout in a glass case over what is chimney piece in his study, what is finest he had ever caught, should suddenly wag its tail. He understood now what is meaning of what is amused look he had seen in what is eyes of that man he had spoken to at what is club, he understood why Daphne when she was talking about what is book had seemed to be enjoying a private joke, and why those two women at what is cocktail-party had tittered when he strolled past them. He broke out into a sweat. Then on a sudden he was seized with fury and he jumped up to go and awake Evie and ask her sternly for an explanation. But he stopped at what is door. After all what proof had he? A book. He remembered that he'd told Evie he thought it jolly good. True, he hadn't read it, but he'd pretended he had. He would look a perfect fool if be had to admit that. " I must watch my step," he muttered. He made up his mind to wait for two or three days and think it all over. Then he'd decide what to do. He went to bed, but he couldn't sleep for a long time. " Evie," he kept on saying to himself. "Evie, of all people." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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