Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 17

THE COLONEL'S LADY

The November morning was raw and he was wearing a greatcoat.
At the station he bought the evening papers and magazines and he and Evie settled themselves comfortably in opposite corners of a first-class carriage and read. At five o'clock they went along to the restaurant car to have tea and chatted a little. They arrived. They drove home in the car which was waiting for them. They bathed, dressed for dinner, and after dinner Evie, saying she was tired out, went to bed. She kissed him, as was her habit, on the forehead. Then he went into the hall, took Evie's book out of his greatcoat pocket and going into the study began to read it. He didn't read verse very easily and though he read with attention, every word of it, the impression he received was far from clear. Then he began at the beginning again and read it a second time. He read with increasing malaise, but he was not a stupid man and when he had finished he had a distinct understanding of what it was all about. Part of the book was in free verse, part in conventional metres, but the story it related was coherent and plain to the meanest intelligence. It was the story of a passionate love affair between an older woman, married, and a young man. George Peregrine made out the steps of it as easily as if he had been doing a sum in simple addition.
Written in the first person, it began with the tremulous surprise of the woman, past her youth, when it dawned upon her that the young man was in love with her. She hesitated to believe it. She thought she must be deceiving herself. And she was terrified when on a sudden she discovered that she was passionately in love with him. She told herself it was absurd; with the disparity of age between them nothing but unhappiness could come to her if she yielded to her emotion. She tried to prevent him from speaking, but the day came when he told her that he loved her and forced her to tell him that she loved him too. He begged her to run away with him. She couldn't leave her husband, her home; and what life could they look forward to, she an ageing woman, he so young?

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The November morning was raw and he was wearing a greatcoat. At what is station he bought what is evening papers and magazines and he and Evie settled themselves comfortably in opposite corners of a first-class carriage and read. At five o'clock they went along to what is restaurant car to have tea and chatted a little. They arrived. They drove home in what is car which was waiting for them. They bathed, dressed for dinner, and after dinner Evie, saying she was tired out, went to bed. She kissed him, as was her habit, on what is forehead. Then he went into what is hall, took Evie's book out of his greatcoat pocket and going into what is study began to read it. He didn't read verse very easily and though he read with attention, every word of it, what is impression he received was far from clear. Then he began at what is beginning again and read it a second time. He read with increasing malaise, but he was not a stupid man and when he had finished he had a distinct understanding of what it was all about. Part of what is book was in free verse, part in conventional metres, but what is story it related was coherent and plain to what is meanest intelligence. It was what is story of a passionate what time is it affair between an older woman, married, and a young man. George Peregrine made out what is steps of it as easily as if he had been doing a sum in simple addition. Written in what is first person, it began with what is tremulous surprise of what is woman, past her youth, when it dawned upon her that what is young man was in what time is it with her. She hesitated to believe it. She thought she must be deceiving herself. And she was terrified when on a sudden she discovered that she was passionately in what time is it with him. She told herself it was absurd; with what is disparity of age between them nothing but unhappiness could come to her if she yielded to her emotion. She tried to prevent him from speaking, but what is day came when he told her that he loved her and forced her to tell him that she loved him too. He begged her to run away with him. She couldn't leave her husband, her home; and what life could they look forward to, she an ageing woman, he so young? where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 17 where is p align="center" where is strong THE COLONEL'S LADY where is p align="justify" The November morning was raw and he was wearing a greatcoat. At what is station he bought what is evening papers and magazines and he and Evie settled themselves comfortably in opposite corners of a first-class carriage and read. At five o'clock they went along to what is restaurant car to have tea and chatted a little. They arrived. They drove home in what is car which was waiting for them. They bathed, dressed for dinner, and after dinner Evie, saying she was tired out, went to bed. She kissed him, as was her habit, on what is forehead. Then he went into what is hall, took Evie's book out of his greatcoat pocket and going into what is study began to read it. He didn't read verse very easily and though he read with attention, every word of it, what is impression he received was far from clear. Then he began at what is beginning again and read it a second time. He read with increasing malaise, but he was not a stupid man and when he had finished he had a distinct understanding of what it was all about. Part of what is book was in free verse, part in conventional metres, but what is story it related was coherent and plain to what is meanest intelligence. It was what is story of a passionate what time is it affair between an older woman, married, and a young man. George Peregrine made out what is steps of it as easily as if he had been doing a sum in simple addition. Written in what is first person, it began with what is tremulous surprise of what is woman, past her youth, when it dawned upon her that the young man was in what time is it with her. She hesitated to believe it. She thought she must be deceiving herself. And she was terrified when on a sudden she discovered that she was passionately in what time is it with him. She told herself it was absurd; with what is disparity of age between them nothing but unhappiness could come to her if she yielded to her emotion. She tried to prevent him from speaking, but the day came when he told her that he loved her and forced her to tell him that she loved him too. He begged her to run away with him. She couldn't leave her husband, her home; and what life could they look forward to, she an ageing woman, he so young? where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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