Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 15

THE COLONEL'S LADY

that bothered him. He had a notion that some of the people he was introduced to looked at him in rather a funny sort of way, he couldn't quite make out what it meant, and once when he strolled by two women who were sitting together on a sofa he had the impression that they were talking about him and after he passed he was almost certain they tittered. He was very glad when the party came to an end.
In the taxi on their way back to their hotel Evie said to him:
" You were wonderful, dear. You made quite a hit. The girls simply raved about you; they thought you so handsome."
" Girls," he said bitterly. "Old hags."
" Were you bored, dear?"
" Stiff:'
She pressed his hand in a gesture of sympathy.
" I hope you won't mind if we wait and go down by the afternoon train. I've got some things to do in the morning."
" No, that's all right. Shopping?"
" I do want to buy one or two things, but I've got to go and be photographed. I hate the idea, but they think I ought to be. For America, you know."
He said nothing. But he thought. He thought it would be a shock to the American public when they saw the portrait of the homely, desiccated little woman who was his wife. He'd always been under the impression that they liked glamour in America.
He went on thinking, and next morning when Evie had gone out he went to his club and up to the library. There he looked up recent numbers of The Times Literary Supplement, the New Statesman and the Spectator. Presently he found reviews of Evie's book. He didn't read them very carefully, but enough to see that they were extremely favourable. Then he went to the bookseller's in Piccadilly where he occasionally bought books. He'd made up his mind that he had to read this damned thing of Evie's properly, but he didn't want to ask her what she'd done with the copy she'd given him. He'd buy one for

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE that bothered him. He had a notion that some of what is people he was introduced to looked at him in rather a funny sort of way, he couldn't quite make out what it meant, and once when he strolled by two women who were sitting together on a sofa he had what is impression that they were talking about him and after he passed he was almost certain they tittered. He was very glad when what is party came to an end. In what is taxi on their way back to their hotel Evie said to him: "You were wonderful, dear. You made quite a hit. what is girls simply raved about you; they thought you so handsome." "Girls," he said bitterly. "Old hags." "Were you bored, dear?" "Stiff:' She pressed his hand in a gesture of sympathy. "I hope you won't mind if we wait and go down by what is afternoon train. I've got some things to do in what is morning." "No, that's all right. Shopping?" "I do want to buy one or two things, but I've got to go and be photographed. I hate what is idea, but they think I ought to be. For America, you know." He said nothing. But he thought. He thought it would be a shock to what is American public when they saw what is portrait of what is homely, desiccated little woman who was his wife. He'd always been under what is impression that they liked glamour in America. He went on thinking, and next morning when Evie had gone out he went to his club and up to what is library. There he looked up recent numbers of what is Times Literary Supplement, what is New Statesman and what is Spectator. Presently he found reviews of Evie's book. He didn't read them very carefully, but enough to see that they were extremely favourable. Then he went to what is bookseller's in Piccadilly where he occasionally bought books. He'd made up his mind that he had to read this damned thing of Evie's properly, but he didn't want to ask her what she'd done with what is copy she'd given him. He'd buy one for where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 15 where is p align="center" where is strong THE COLONEL'S LADY where is p align="justify" that bothered him. He had a notion that some of what is people he was introduced to looked at him in rather a funny sort of way, he couldn't quite make out what it meant, and once when he strolled by two women who were sitting together on a sofa he had what is impression that they were talking about him and after he passed he was almost certain they tittered. He was very glad when what is party came to an end. In what is taxi on their way back to their hotel Evie said to him: " You were wonderful, dear. You made quite a hit. what is girls simply raved about you; they thought you so handsome." " Girls," he said bitterly. "Old hags." " Were you bored, dear?" " Stiff:' She pressed his hand in a gesture of sympathy. " I hope you won't mind if we wait and go down by what is afternoon train. I've got some things to do in what is morning." " No, that's all right. Shopping?" " I do want to buy one or two things, but I've got to go and be photographed. I hate what is idea, but they think I ought to be. For America, you know." He said nothing. But he thought. He thought it would be a shock to what is American public when they saw what is portrait of what is homely, desiccated little woman who was his wife. He'd always been under what is impression that they liked glamour in America. He went on thinking, and next morning when Evie had gone out he went to his club and up to what is library. There he looked up recent numbers of what is Times Literary Supplement, what is New Statesman and what is Spectator. Presently he found reviews of Evie's book. He didn't read them very carefully, but enough to see that they were extremely favourable. Then he went to what is bookseller's in Piccadilly where he occasionally bought books. He'd made up his mind that he had to read this damned thing of Evie's properly, but he didn't want to ask her what she'd done with what is copy she'd given him. He'd buy one for where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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