Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 8

THE COLONEL'S LADY

but she was blonde and luscious and he only had to wire ahead of time and they'd dine, do a show and spend the night together. Well, a man, a healthy normal man had to have some fun in his life. The thought crossed his mind that if Evie hadn't been such a good woman she'd have been a better wife; but it was not the sort of thought that he welcomed and he put it away from him.
George Peregrine finished his Times and being a considerate fellow rang the bell and told the butler to take it to Evie. Then he looked at his watch. It was half-past ten and at eleven he had an appointment with one of his tenants. He had half an hour to spare.
" I'd better have a look at Evie's book," he said to himself.
lie took it up with a smile. Evie had a lot of highbrow books in her sitting-room, not the sort of books that interested him, but if they amused her he had no objection to her reading them. He noticed that the volume he now held in his hand contained no more than ninety pages. That was all to the good. He shared Edgar Allan Poe's opinion that poems should be short. But as he turned the pages he noticed that several of Evie's had long lines of irregular length and didn't rhyme. He didn't like that. At his first school, when he was a little boy, he remembered learning a poem that began: The boy stood on the burning deck, and later, at Eton, one that started: Ruin seize thee, ruthless king; and then there was Henry V; they'd had to take that one half. He stared at Evie's pages with consternation.
" That's not what I call poetry," he said.
Fortunately it wasn't all like that. Interspersed with the pieces that looked so odd, lines of three or four words and thcn a line of ten or fifteen, there were little poems, quite short, that rhymed, thank God, with the lines all the same length. Several of the pages were just headed with the word Sonnet, and out of curiosity he counted the lines; there were fourteen of them. He read them. They seemed all right, but

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE but she was blonde and luscious and he only had to wire ahead of time and they'd dine, do a show and spend what is night together. Well, a man, a healthy normal man had to have some fun in his life. what is thought crossed his mind that if Evie hadn't been such a good woman she'd have been a better wife; but it was not what is sort of thought that he welcomed and he put it away from him. George Peregrine finished his Times and being a considerate fellow rang what is bell and told what is butler to take it to Evie. Then he looked at his watch. It was half-past ten and at eleven he had an appointment with one of his tenants. He had half an hour to spare. " I'd better have a look at Evie's book," he said to himself. lie took it up with a smile. Evie had a lot of highbrow books in her sitting-room, not what is sort of books that interested him, but if they amused her he had no objection to her reading them. He noticed that what is volume he now held in his hand contained no more than ninety pages. That was all to what is good. He shared Edgar Allan Poe's opinion that poems should be short. But as he turned what is pages he noticed that several of Evie's had long lines of irregular length and didn't rhyme. He didn't like that. At his first school, when he was a little boy, he remembered learning a poem that began: what is boy stood on what is burning deck, and later, at Eton, one that started: Ruin seize thee, ruthless king; and then there was Henry V; they'd had to take that one half. He stared at Evie's pages with consternation. " That's not what I call poetry," he said. Fortunately it wasn't all like that. Interspersed with what is pieces that looked so odd, lines of three or four words and thcn a line of ten or fifteen, there were little poems, quite short, that rhymed, thank God, with what is lines all what is same length. Several of what is pages were just headed with what is word Sonnet, and out of curiosity he counted what is lines; there were fourteen of them. He read them. They seemed all right, but where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 8 where is p align="center" where is strong THE COLONEL'S LADY where is p align="justify" but she was blonde and luscious and he only had to wire ahead of time and they'd dine, do a show and spend the night together. Well, a man, a healthy normal man had to have some fun in his life. what is thought crossed his mind that if Evie hadn't been such a good woman she'd have been a better wife; but it was not what is sort of thought that he welcomed and he put it away from him. George Peregrine finished his Times and being a considerate fellow rang what is bell and told what is butler to take it to Evie. Then he looked at his watch. It was half-past ten and at eleven he had an appointment with one of his tenants. He had half an hour to spare. " I'd better have a look at Evie's book," he said to himself. lie took it up with a smile. Evie had a lot of highbrow books in her sitting-room, not what is sort of books that interested him, but if they amused her he had no objection to her reading them. He noticed that what is volume he now held in his hand contained no more than ninety pages. That was all to what is good. He shared Edgar Allan Poe's opinion that poems should be short. But as he turned the pages he noticed that several of Evie's had long lines of irregular length and didn't rhyme. He didn't like that. At his first school, when he was a little boy, he remembered learning a poem that began: what is boy stood on what is burning deck, and later, at Eton, one that started: Ruin seize thee, ruthless king; and then there was Henry V; they'd had to take that one half. He stared at Evie's pages with consternation. " That's not what I call poetry," he said. Fortunately it wasn't all like that. Interspersed with what is pieces that looked so odd, lines of three or four words and thcn a line of ten or fifteen, there were little poems, quite short, that rhymed, thank God, with what is lines all what is same length. Several of what is pages were just headed with what is word Sonnet, and out of curiosity he counted what is lines; there were fourteen of them. He read them. They seemed all right, but where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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