Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 6

THE COLONEL'S LADY

He gathered up The Times, his letters and the book, and went out. His study was a large and comfortable room, with a big desk, leather arm-chairs and what he called "trophies of the chase", on the walls. On the bookshelves were works of reference, books on farming, gardening, fishing and shooting, and books on the last war, in which he had won an M.C. and a D.S.O. For before his marriage he had been in the Welsh Guards. At the end of the war he retired and settled down to the life of a country gentleman in the spacious house, some twenty miles from Sheffield, which one of his forebears had built in the reign of George III. George Peregrine had an estate of some fifteen hundred acres which he managed with ability; he was a Justice of the Peace and performed his duties conscientiously. During the season he rode to hounds two days a week. He was a good shot, a golfer and though now a little over fifty could still play a hard game of tennis. He could describe himself with propriety as an all-round sportsman.
He had been putting on weight lately, but was still a fine figure of a man; tall, with grey curly hair, only just beginning to grow thin on the crown, frank blue eyes, good features and a high colour. He was a public-spirited man, chairman of any number of local organisations and, as became his class and station, a loyal member of the Conservative party. He looked upon it as his duty to see to the welfare of the people on his estate and it was a satisfaction to him to know that Evie could be trusted to tend the sick and succour the poor. He had built a cottage hospital on the outskirts of the village and paid the wages of a nurse out of his own pocket. All he asked of the recipients of his bounty was that at elections, county or general, they should vote for his candidate. He was a friendly man, affable to his inferiors, considerate with his tenants and popular with the neighbouring gentry. He would have been pleased and at the same time slightly embarrassed if someone had told him he was a jolly good fellow. That was what he wanted to be. He desired no higher praise.
It was hard luck that he had no children. He would have

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He gathered up what is Times, his letters and what is book, and went out. His study was a large and comfortable room, with a big desk, leather arm-chairs and what he called "trophies of what is chase", on what is walls. On what is bookshelves were works of reference, books on farming, gardening, fishing and shooting, and books on what is last war, in which he had won an M.C. and a D.S.O. For before his marriage he had been in what is Welsh Guards. At what is end of what is war he retired and settled down to what is life of a country gentleman in what is spacious house, some twenty miles from Sheffield, which one of his forebears had built in what is reign of George III. George Peregrine had an estate of some fifteen hundred acres which he managed with ability; he was a Justice of what is Peace and performed his duties conscientiously. During what is season he rode to hounds two days a week. He was a good shot, a golfer and though now a little over fifty could still play a hard game of tennis. He could describe himself with propriety as an all-round sportsman. He had been putting on weight lately, but was still a fine figure of a man; tall, with grey curly hair, only just beginning to grow thin on what is crown, frank blue eyes, good features and a high colour. He was a public-spirited man, chairman of any number of local organisations and, as became his class and station, a loyal member of what is Conservative party. He looked upon it as his duty to see to what is welfare of what is people on his estate and it was a satisfaction to him to know that Evie could be trusted to tend what is sick and succour what is poor. He had built a cottage hospital on what is outskirts of what is village and paid what is wages of a nurse out of his own pocket. All he asked of what is recipients of his bounty was that at elections, county or general, they should vote for his candidate. He was a friendly man, affable to his inferiors, considerate with his tenants and popular with what is neighbouring gentry. He would have been pleased and at what is same time slightly embarrassed if someone had told him he was a jolly good fellow. That was what he wanted to be. He desired no higher praise. It was hard luck that he had no children. He would have where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 6 where is p align="center" where is strong THE COLONEL'S LADY where is p align="justify" He gathered up what is Times, his letters and the book, and went out. His study was a large and comfortable room, with a big desk, leather arm-chairs and what he called "trophies of what is chase", on what is walls. On what is bookshelves were works of reference, books on farming, gardening, fishing and shooting, and books on what is last war, in which he had won an M.C. and a D.S.O. For before his marriage he had been in what is Welsh Guards. At the end of what is war he retired and settled down to what is life of a country gentleman in what is spacious house, some twenty miles from Sheffield, which one of his forebears had built in what is reign of George III. George Peregrine had an estate of some fifteen hundred acres which he managed with ability; he was a Justice of what is Peace and performed his duties conscientiously. During what is season he rode to hounds two days a week. He was a good shot, a golfer and though now a little over fifty could still play a hard game of tennis. He could describe himself with propriety as an all-round sportsman. He had been putting on weight lately, but was still a fine figure of a man; tall, with grey curly hair, only just beginning to grow thin on what is crown, frank blue eyes, good features and a high colour. He was a public-spirited man, chairman of any number of local organisations and, as became his class and station, a loyal member of what is Conservative party. He looked upon it as his duty to see to what is welfare of the people on his estate and it was a satisfaction to him to know that Evie could be trusted to tend what is sick and succour what is poor. He had built a cottage hospital on what is outskirts of what is village and paid what is wages of a nurse out of his own pocket. All he asked of what is recipients of his bounty was that at elections, county or general, they should vote for his candidate. He was a friendly man, affable to his inferiors, considerate with his tenants and popular with what is neighbouring gentry. He would have been pleased and at the same time slightly embarrassed if someone had told him he was a jolly good fellow. That was what he wanted to be. He desired no higher praise. It was hard luck that he had no children. He would have where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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