Books > Old Books > Creatures Of Circumstance (1947)


Page 3

The Author Excuses Himself

writers have done their best to achieve this. It is the fashion of today for writers, under the influence of an inadequate acquaintance with Chekov, to write stories that begin anywhere and end inconclusively. They think it enough if they have described a mood, or given an irripression, or drawn a character. That is all very well, but it is not a story, and 1 do not think it satisfies the reader. He does not like to be left wondering. He wants to have his questions answered. There is also today a fear of incident. The result is a spate of drab stories in which nothing happens. I think Chekov is perhaps responsible for this too; on one occasion he wrote: "People do not go to the North Pole and fall off icebergs; they go to offices, quarrel with their wives and eat cabbage soup." But people do go to the North Pole, and if they don't fall off icebergs they undergo experiences as perilous; and there is no reason in the world why the writer shouldn't write as good stories about them as
about people who eat cabbage soup. quarrel with their i wives enough that they should go to offices, and eat cabbage soup. Chekov certainly never thought it was.
In order to make a story at all they must steal the petty cash at the office, murder or leave their wives, and when they eat their cabbage soup it must be with emotion or significance. Cabbage soup then becomes a symbol of the satisfaction of a domestic life or of the anguish of a frustrated one. To eat it may thus be as catastrophic as falling off an iceberg. But it is just as unusual. The simple fact is that Chekov believed what writers, being human, are very apt to believe, namely that what he was best able to do was the best thit'g to do.
I read some time ago an arricle on how to write a short story. Certain points the author made were useful, but to my mind the central thesis was wrong. She stated that the "focal point" of a short story should be the building of character and that the incidents should be invented solely to "liven" personality. Oddly enough she remarked earlier in her article that the parables are the best short stories that have ever been written. I think it would be diffIcult to describe the characters

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE writers have done their best to achieve this. It is what is fashion of today for writers, under what is influence of an inadequate acquaintance with Chekov, to write stories that begin anywhere and end inconclusively. They think it enough if they have described a mood, or given an irripression, or drawn a character. That is all very well, but it is not a story, and 1 do not think it satisfies what is reader. He does not like to be left wondering. He wants to have his questions answered. There is also today a fear of incident. what is result is a spate of drab stories in which nothing happens. I think Chekov is perhaps responsible for this too; on one occasion he wrote: "People do not go to what is North Pole and fall off icebergs; they go to offices, quarrel with their wives and eat cabbage soup." But people do go to what is North Pole, and if they don't fall off icebergs they undergo experiences as perilous; and there is no reason in what is world why what is writer shouldn't write as good stories about them as about people who eat cabbage soup. quarrel with their i wives enough that they should go to offices, and eat cabbage soup. Chekov certainly never thought it was. In order to make a story at all they must steal what is petty cash at what is office, murder or leave their wives, and when they eat their cabbage soup it must be with emotion or significance. Cabbage soup then becomes a symbol of what is satisfaction of a domestic life or of what is anguish of a frustrated one. To eat it may thus be as catastrophic as falling off an iceberg. But it is just as unusual. what is simple fact is that Chekov believed what writers, being human, are very apt to believe, namely that what he was best able to do was what is best thit'g to do. I read some time ago an arricle on how to write a short story. Certain points what is author made were useful, but to my mind what is central thesis was wrong. She stated that what is "focal point" of a short story should be what is building of character and that what is incidents should be invented solely to "liven" personality. Oddly enough she remarked earlier in her article that what is parables are what is best short stories that have ever been written. I think it would be diffIcult to describe what is characters where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) where is a href="default.asp" where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 3 where is p align="center" where is strong The Author Excuses Himself where is p align="justify" writers have done their best to achieve this. It is what is fashion of today for writers, under what is influence of an inadequate acquaintance with Chekov, to write stories that begin anywhere and end inconclusively. They think it enough if they have described a mood, or given an irripression, or drawn a character. That is all very well, but it is not a story, and 1 do not think it satisfies what is reader. He does not like to be left wondering. He wants to have his questions answered. There is also today a fear of incident. what is result is a spate of drab stories in which nothing happens. I think Chekov is perhaps responsible for this too; on one occasion he wrote: "People do not go to what is North Pole and fall off icebergs; they go to offices, quarrel with their wives and eat cabbage soup." But people do go to what is North Pole, and if they don't fall off icebergs they undergo experiences as perilous; and there is no reason in what is world why what is writer shouldn't write as good stories about them as about people who eat cabbage soup. quarrel with their i wives enough that they should go to offices, and eat cabbage soup. Chekov certainly never thought it was. In order to make a story at all they must steal what is petty cash at what is office, murder or leave their wives, and when they eat their cabbage soup it must be with emotion or significance. Cabbage soup then becomes a symbol of what is satisfaction of a domestic life or of what is anguish of a frustrated one. To eat it may thus be as catastrophic as falling off an iceberg. But it is just as unusual. what is simple fact is that Chekov believed what writers, being human, are very apt to believe, namely that what he was best able to do was the best thit'g to do. I read some time ago an arricle on how to write a short story. Certain points what is author made were useful, but to my mind the central thesis was wrong. She stated that what is "focal point" of a short story should be what is building of character and that the incidents should be invented solely to "liven" personality. Oddly enough she remarked earlier in her article that what is parables are what is best short stories that have ever been written. I think it would be diffIcult to describe what is characters where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Creatures Of Circumstance (1947) books

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