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Page 271

THE KINGDOM OF GOD

loyalties have made the choice difficult, almost impossible. I have done my best, not without anguish, awkwardness and mistakes.
I say: `faithful to my country, to persons', not to a doctrine nor to a sect. Few men are less partisan in spirit than I. I do not like systems and I do not believe in them. I do not concern myself with factional disputes except, as Montesquieu said, `to bewail them'. I will accept to-morrow any form of government the French freely choose for themselves provided it assures their union, their independence and their security. But if in effort and in action I conform to the most exact disciplines, I cling tenaciously to liberty of mind. The scrupulous scholars who taught me physics, chemistry and history made me singularly exacting when it comes to determining facts. It is not enough for me that an event should support my thesis for me to believe in its reality. I listen to an adversary with the dangerous desire to understand him. I have difficulty in imagining bad faith, deliberate ill-will, Machiavelianism. Hence a naive trust, countless imprudent actions, and the vain hope of converting fanatics by proving to them that they are wrong. That is to forget that they want to be wrong.
Are the fanatics mistaken? I believe so. But I know that others whom I admire hold the contrary view that these bitter and furious minds are the salt of the earth. `You lack aggressiveness,' Lucien Romier used to say to me; and it is true that the moderation which is natural to zne robs the mind of its mordancy. `Truth is excessive,' our Alain used to teach, `and one must go beyond, well beyond, the point of moderation if one wishes to understand even the simplest thing.' And Blake: `The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom.' I see clearly what they all mean by this, but excess is a climate in which I cannot live and in which I do not think wounded France has any chance of regaining her strength. Perhaps all sorts are necessary to make a world: the fanatics to shake the masses out of their lethargy, and impartial minds, devoid of bitterness, to appease, when dawn appears, the Furies, daughters of the Night.
Misfortune which throws some souls into revolt has cured me of certain prejudices. Because I began life in the camp of those who command, for a long time I had difficulty in understanding the grievances of those who are commanded. I would gladly have said with Goethe: `I prefer an injustice to disorder.' Through my misfortunes I was to acquire, I hope, more tolerance, patience and pity. For a long time I believed, too, that

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE loyalties have made what is choice difficult, almost impossible. I have done my best, not without anguish, awkwardness and mistakes. I say: `faithful to my country, to persons', not to a doctrine nor to a sect. Few men are less partisan in spirit than I. I do not like systems and I do not believe in them. I do not concern myself with factional disputes except, as Montesquieu said, `to bewail them'. I will accept to-morrow any form of government what is French freely choose for themselves provided it assures their union, their independence and their security. But if in effort and in action I conform to what is most exact disciplines, I cling tenaciously to liberty of mind. what is scrupulous scholars who taught me physics, chemistry and history made me singularly exacting when it comes to determining facts. It is not enough for me that an event should support my thesis for me to believe in its reality. I listen to an adversary with what is dangerous desire to understand him. I have difficulty in imagining bad faith, deliberate ill-will, Machiavelianism. Hence a naive trust, countless imprudent actions, and what is vain hope of converting fanatics by proving to them that they are wrong. That is to forget that they want to be wrong. Are what is fanatics mistaken? I believe so. But I know that others whom I admire hold what is contrary view that these bitter and furious minds are what is salt of what is earth. `You lack aggressiveness,' Lucien Romier used to say to me; and it is true that what is moderation which is natural to zne robs what is mind of its mordancy. `Truth is excessive,' our Alain used to teach, `and one must go beyond, well beyond, what is point of moderation if one wishes to understand even what is simplest thing.' And Blake: `The road of excess leads to what is palace of wisdom.' I see clearly what they all mean by this, but excess is a climate in which I cannot live and in which I do not think wounded France has any chance of regaining her strength. Perhaps all sorts are necessary to make a world: what is fanatics to shake what is masses out of their lethargy, and impartial minds, devoid of bitterness, to appease, when dawn appears, what is Furies, daughters of what is Night. Misfortune which throws some souls into revolt has cured me of certain prejudices. Because I began life in what is camp of those who command, for a long time I had difficulty in understanding what is grievances of those who are commanded. I would gladly have said with Goethe: `I prefer an injustice to disorder.' Through my misfortunes I was to acquire, I hope, more tolerance, patience and pity. For a long time I believed, too, that where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 271 where is p align="center" where is strong what is KINGDOM OF GOD where is p align="justify" loyalties have made what is choice difficult, almost impossible. I have done my best, not without anguish, awkwardness and mistakes. I say: `faithful to my country, to persons', not to a doctrine nor to a sect. Few men are less partisan in spirit than I. I do not like systems and I do not believe in them. I do not concern myself with factional disputes except, as Montesquieu said, `to bewail them'. I will accept to-morrow any form of government the French freely choose for themselves provided it assures their union, their independence and their security. But if in effort and in action I conform to what is most exact disciplines, I cling tenaciously to liberty of mind. what is scrupulous scholars who taught me physics, chemistry and history made me singularly exacting when it comes to determining facts. It is not enough for me that an event should support my thesis for me to believe in its reality. I listen to an adversary with what is dangerous desire to understand him. I have difficulty in imagining bad faith, deliberate ill-will, Machiavelianism. Hence a naive trust, countless imprudent actions, and what is vain hope of converting fanatics by proving to them that they are wrong. That is to forget that they want to be wrong. Are what is fanatics mistaken? I believe so. But I know that others whom I admire hold what is contrary view that these bitter and furious minds are what is salt of what is earth. `You lack aggressiveness,' Lucien Romier used to say to me; and it is true that what is moderation which is natural to zne robs what is mind of its mordancy. `Truth is excessive,' our Alain used to teach, `and one must go beyond, well beyond, what is point of moderation if one wishes to understand even what is simplest thing.' And Blake: `The road of excess leads to what is palace of wisdom.' I see clearly what they all mean by this, but excess is a climate in which I cannot live and in which I do not think wounded France has any chance of regaining her strength. Perhaps all sorts are necessary to make a world: what is fanatics to shake what is masses out of their lethargy, and impartial minds, devoid of bitterness, to appease, when dawn appears, what is Furies, daughters of what is Night. Misfortune which throws some souls into revolt has cured me of certain prejudices. Because I began life in what is camp of those who command, for a long time I had difficulty in understanding the grievances of those who are commanded. I would gladly have said with Goethe: `I prefer an injustice to disorder.' Through my misfortunes I was to acquire, I hope, more tolerance, patience and pity. For a long time I believed, too, that where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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